Without Rhymes or Reasons

September 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

As I was going to St. Ives,
I met a man with seven wives,
Each wife had seven sacks,
Each sack had seven cats,
Each cat had seven kits:
Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,
How many were there going to St. Ives?
—English nursery rhyme, 1835

The Wall Street Journal – Stocks are up in the UK for rat traps, sacks and kits after analysts say there may be a huge need for such items because a man was going to St. Ives. Of course, these are the same inside traders who touted Enron, steam locomotives and the New Coke.

Variety – Boffo Mystery Thriller: Latest scoop from across the pond is that “a man,” (hackers report it’s Tom Cruise on crutches), comes across another man (Johnny Depp?) with several beautiful babes carrying microchips and tapes, disguised as mice, cats and rats, stolen from the evil Capt. Drano. Working title: Mission Improbable. Our moles in the ‘Wood tell us a pirated copy is easily accessible on the Weather Channel. Also, new musical for Broadway, Cats With Rats, although there is a lawsuit pending by Andrew Lloyd Webber.

Press release from FEMA – Death and destruction have hit St. Ives, a small village in England, and our rescue workers are on the way as soon they complete their work along the Texas Gulf Coast, which they are still trying to find.

Fox News – A woman, identified only as Hillary C., was caught trying to smuggle bombs, unused at Benghazi, for ISIS terrorists to blow up an innocent English village, according to what someone said. President Trump, our noble leader, in a 20-second news conference on the third tee, claimed there was blame on both sides: “Cats like rats. Which reminds me, those rats in the White House who are leaking the truth will be hunted down and sent to Guantanamo Bay – a beautiful place for my next spa, beach and water boarding – for enhanced interrogation. Only seven wives? What a bunch of losers.”

Local TV News – This just in! Rats, cats and kittens are running wild right here in our town! Well, not exactly here, but somewhere, just like when we can’t show a good car wreck or apartment fire from here, we’ll show you one from Waco or Detroit or, once, from Johannesburg, South Africa. Remember that one, Sue? Sure do, and by the way, Chip, that’s a nice tie you’ve got on. I’ll bet your wife gave it you. No? Quickly moving on, we’ll be right back with World War Three after these messages.

Press release from the NRA: A small English village has been pillaged by a horde of rats because those cowardly Limies won’t allow residents to carry unregistered AK-47s, much less a decent howitzer, so what can you expect? Defend the Second Amendment or America will also be overrun with rats, cats and sacks. Meantime, give your wives a pink pearl handled Smith & Wesson, just the thing for your next anniversary.

MSNBC – A fascist plot to harm the residents of a quaint English village was thwarted by a brave liberal watchdog when he spotted a man, no doubt a conservative Mormon because he had seven wives, with rats which, scientists say, can carry the bubonic plague. Our sources report Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller is investigating a link between this potential epidemic and the White House, specifically the President’s immediately family, plus those on his staff, groundskeepers and most visitors. Subpoenaed emails clearly show that Jared Kushner has used “met,” “going” and “seven” in his messages to, who knows, the Kremlin?

The New York Times – St. Ives, England – A man (homo sapien) was going to this village in Cornwall, a busy fishing port, where he came upon another man with many cats (Felinus) to stop the rats (Rattus) destroying the fishing (Swimeus) gear, although some people argue it was St Ives, Cambridgeshire, an ancient market town and therefore a distinct possibility. Reliable sources say that if the traveler met the group leaving the town and coming towards him, then the correct answer is one, the narrator. But if he overtook them, all going the same way, then the answer is 2,802: 1 man, 7 wives, 49 sacks, 343 cats, and 2,401 kits, plus the narrator. See: Pages 4-12 “History of St. Ives (1340-2017) and Cambridgeshire – Bastion of market towns,” a special 14-page section: “British Country Roads in Need of Repair,” and our lead editorial: “Animals in Sacks — how long the cruelty?”

Exterior of the Seven Wives public house in St Ives, Cambridgeshire, on a summer’s night. By David Bartlett.

Press release from the ACLU – The British government must take steps to rid towns bearing religious names. St. Ives is the perfect example of mixing church and state. If the British can cut ties with the rest of Europe, then certainly they can rename the hundreds if not thousands of towns, streets and, yes, cathedrals, smacking of religion. God help us all!

ESPN – How about this blow-out? The St. Ives Wives scored 7, with seven sacks, while the Cats had 343 and the Fightin’ Kits with a huge 2,401. Remarkable, eh, Rabid Robert? Hey, Rabid Robert, I’m talking to you. Sorry, but he’s had 12 concussions and doesn’t communicate very well.

Tweet from unknown source at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C. – President Donald (The Great) Trump visited the Texas Gulf Coast to lend his magnificent presence to those poor (under $100 mil) peasants drowning in a crystal clear sea of oil and mud. They were glad to view in person His Trumpship, and asked for his blessing and $30 trillion. The record-sized crowds continued to shout an old Texas expression about retrieving their vehicles from the flood: “Get a rope!”#your welcome

Mother Goose – Kits, cats, sacks, and wives.
Such a cast gives me the hives.
Like rock-a-by baby, who fell to his doom.
Or Humpty Dumpty they ate with a spoon.
Jack fell down and broke his crown.
Who cares how many went to town?

H Texas Cares: Hurricane Harvey Relief

September 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Features

As each day passes, we are more aware of how devastating Hurricane Harvey has been to the people of this great city.  Our thoughts are with you and our hopes are each and every one of you are safe, dry and coping well with this unprecedented disaster. Our mission is to connect you with organizations assisting with relief.

Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund

Houston Food Bank

United Way of Greater Houston

Houston Humane Society

Texas Diaper Bank 

L.G.B.T.Q. Disaster Relief Fund

National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster

You Caring

GlobalGiving’s Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund 

All Hands Volunteers

Texas Gets Dressed Down

August 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

by Lynn Ashby

THE RESTAURANT – This is a relatively fancy place — not much lipstick on the glasses — but there is something I notice about the clientele: Their clothes. Put it this way, I am the only grown man here wearing long pants. All the other males are in shorts. So are most of the women and all of the children. Used not to be this way, which leads us to today’s discussion: dress codes are changing. Is this good or bad? Will spats make a comeback, and who needs ties? I am all for comfortable clothes, but “No shoes, no shirt, no service,” has become: “No shoes, no shirt, no problem.”

            We begin here in this restaurant. These are the dog days of summer in Texas, when you can fry an egg on your egg. Along the Gulf Coast we can add the humidity. But restaurants are freezing year-round, so I always keep a sweater in my car to bring into eateries. This place is Ice Station Zebra on the Bayou because the restaurant’s staff of bus boys, waiters and cooks is in charge of the thermostat. They are running around, sweating like an immigrant at a Trump rally. They are hot, so they keep making this place colder. As for the customers, we freeze, or at least I do. My own dress code is defined by the temperature, not the ambiance. I am wearing long pants, a long-sleeve shirt and my handy sweater. These other folks eating here are in their shorts, T-shirts and flip-flops. They must be newly arrived from Boston. Even the up-town eateries seem to have dropped their dress codes. In years past, men were required to wear a coat and tie. Not now. The more down-scale you go, the dress is casual down to sloppy.

At this point I should note that, if there is no longer a dress code, there should still be a taste code. Over at another table are two of the fattest, grossest men with their bare stomachs protruding out from under their skin-tight T-shirts and their legs look like bear fur. Their female counterparts are fat, sloppy and should be confined to the take-out lane. Yuk.

Dressed for lunch at restaurants can be different. Casual Fridays are now casual 2017. A table may be filled with men wearing sport shirts, slacks and dress shoes or maybe nice boots, but no one seems to wear a tie to work anymore. The women are all neatly dressed for business, but high-heels must have gone the way of men’s ties. At least no one is in shorts. The same cannot be said for your local grocery store. Between Easter and Halloween, shorts are de rigueur on Aisle 5. During the day, young mothers come in wearing their tennis garb. I wonder how many of them really play tennis. Oh, and they all are holding a plastic bottle of imported water and an iPhone. Occasionally, at the grocers, after work you will see guys wearing their green scrubs. This tells everyone: “I am a doctor. Show some respect.”   

                  Over the years what we wore outside of the house, ranch or job at the hog rendering plant was predictable. Clothes were for looks, not comfort. However, if you watched “Downton Abbey,” you noticed how the upper class got all gussied up for dinner. Their dressing started about 4 p.m., but then they had nothing else to do. The ladies wore long dresses with lots of jewelry, and the gentlemen were in a tux. Those times being before dry cleaning, we can only guess what the table smelled like on a summer night. On this side of the pond (the new term for the Atlantic Ocean, and it’s shorter), the Vanderbilts and the Astors did the same. Speaking of the pond, in the movie, “Titanic,” set in 1912, the dress code for the upper crust was about the same. And look at those old photos of people standing on the Galveston beach during the summer. It’s 102 degrees with 100 percent humidity. The women’s dresses were several layers of cloth and went from turtle neck to the ground, while the men were wearing white linen suits, high collars, ties and straw hats. They look miserable.

SMU Central University Libraries, Set 72157648199129764, ID 16208433948, Original title [People Walking on the Beach Boulevard and Sitting on the Great Seawall in Galveston, Texas]

            My father brought home one of the first pair of Bermuda shorts I had seen. My mother wouldn’t let him wear them out of the house. Once as a senior in high school, I and a few other boys decided to attend school wearing Bermuda shorts. We didn’t even get to our first class before we were sent to the principal’s office where we were lectured about proper clothing etiquette, and sent home to change. Today during warm days, students are sent home for not wearing shorts. As a UT student I worked the cafeteria line at a dorm holding 452 female students. (I would have paid for the job). The dress code (or co-ed) for lunch and dinner was a skirt with blouse or a dress, strictly enforced. One time a girl showed up wearing, culottes, and was sent back to her room to change clothes. Now I think that dorm’s dress code is “whatever fits.” Same for their live-in boyfriends.

Today Bermuda shorts are worn everywhere, even to church, and you have been wondering why Bermuda shorts are called that. Guess what? They didn’t originate in Bermuda, although at the Summer Olympics the Bermuda team marches in wearing red Bermuda shorts (red  being the main color in their flag). During World War II, British military wore shorts in tropical and desert warfare, but, being proper King’s troops, they wore long socks. Meanwhile, there was a shortage of clothing in Bermuda, so two banks got a local tailor to make shorts, modeled on those worn by the British military, for their male employees, with long socks, of course. This was the beginning of Bermuda shorts as business attire in Bermuda, a fad which quickly spread to Texas restaurants – minus socks.


Ashby wears ashby2@comcast.net

The Art of the Deal

August 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

by Lynn Ashby

U.S. Rep. John Culberson, a Republican from Houston, is including language in a foreign relations bill urging the State Department to negotiate with Mexico for the return of the only flag on the Texian side known to have survived the Battle of the Alamo in 1836. It is called the New Orleans Greys flag, carried by two companies of volunteers from the United States who fought on behalf of Texas’ independence. The flag was taken by Mexican General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna after the battle and forwarded to Mexico (Santa Anna went on to victory at San Jacinto) where it has remained for the last 181 years. It is held in the Museo Nacional, or I guess it is. I first saw the flag there in a big glass case beside several other Lone Star flags captured in battle. A few years later I revisited the spot and the flag was gone. “It’s being restored,” I was told. Three years later I was told the same thing.

Courtesy of Wikipedia.

          This brings us to an interesting tale of several arms and a leg, and the plot for a good movie. The flag is not the Lone Star flag we use today, but is 4 feet by 6 feet, sort of dirty gray in color and made of silk. Across the top of the banner are the words: “First Company of TEXAN” then there is an eagle holding a banner reading, “God & Country.” At the bottom is: “Volunteers! From New-Orleans.” The flag was presented by a pretty young girl to the New-Orleans Greys when they entered Texas in 1836. They were headed for a mission in San Antonio. It is known that at least two other flags were taken into the Alamo, but at dawn of March 6, 1836, when the last assault began, the Greys’ flag was the only one flying. It stood atop the barracks and so infuriated the attacking Mexicans that three different color sergeants of the Jimenez Battalion tried to climb up and rip it down. Each one was killed. Finally, Lt. Jose Maria Torres of the Zapadores Battalion made it to the roof, ripped down the Greys’ flag and, with the aid of Lt. Damasco Martinez, ran up the Mexican flag. Both were killed, but the Alamo flag never flew again.

            Later, Santa Anna sent the flag and a note back to the Mexican government explaining his victory, and his huge losses. He wrote, “The bearer takes with him one of the flags of the enemy’s battalions, captured today.” He goes on to write that the “New-Orleans” on the flag clearly shows “the true intention of the treacherous colonists . . . who came from the ports of the United States of the North.” The flag stayed in a drawer in Chapultepec Castle for 98 years, until 1934, when it was discovered. But it stayed put until the late 1960s when Walter Lord, an American historian, pulled open the drawer and found the Alamo flag with the note still pinned to it.

Since then Texas has tried everything to get it back. A special effort was made in 1986 during Texas’ Sesquicentennial celebration. Mexican officials said that the flag was too fragile for travel. There was a plan to trade the death mask of Pancho Villa for the flag. But the mask had been returned to Mexico a short time before by its owner. In 1991 the Texas Legislature asked President George H.W. Bush to make the flag’s return part of the NAFTA negotiations. Again, no luck. (We lost some bargaining chips when, during the 1950s, the United States unconditionally returned 69 captured battle flags to Mexico.) In 1994, State Sen. Carlos Truan of Corpus Christi said that the Mexican consul in that city, Armando Beteta, raised the possibility of trading the Alamo flag for three Mexican battle flags captured at San Jacinto. Nada. One group of Austinites reportedly discussed paying as much as $36,000 to have the flag stolen or otherwise obtained outside official channels, i.e. a bribe, or hire a cat burglar, maybe trade it for Santa Anna’s leg.

This brings us to the leg and my idea. I quote liberally from others’ research. Two years after the Battle of the Alamo, Santa Anna led a makeshift army against French forces that had invaded Veracruz. After the general was severely wounded, doctors amputated his leg, which Santa Anna buried at his Veracruz hacienda. After he once again assumed the presidency in 1842, Santa Anna exhumed his shriveled leg, paraded it to Mexico City in an ornate coach and buried it beneath a cemetery monument in an elaborate state funeral. However, in 1844, public opinion turned on the president, rioters tore down his statues and dug up his leg. A mob tied the severed appendage to a rope and dragged it through the streets of Mexico City while shouting, “Death to the cripple!”

But the Napoleon of the West had an artificial leg. He had once again become president of Mexico (seven times), and during a battle in the Mexican-American War, the 4th Illinois Infantry surprised Santa Anna, who fled without his cork and wooden leg. The soldiers seized the leg as a trophy and brought back to their home state, where it toured at county fairs before ending up at the Illinois State Military Museum. Mexico’s repeated requests to repatriate Santa Anna’s fake limb have been denied. So we buy the leg from Illinois, which is almost broke and in desperate need of money, then trade it to Mexico for our flag. Or my idea: The heist movie. A Ross Perot-like mogul, who explains he already has the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Magna Carta and Gettysburg Address, (“the ‘real ones’ are copies”), hires Raul “The Cat” LeSneak to steal the Alamo flag. Mexican Detective Jose Garcia is out to prevent it. Midnight roof tops, a fake flag, the car chase, an O. Henry ending. Pass the popcorn. 

 


Ashby directs at ashby2@comcast.net

Charles Argento

August 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Argento, Charles

Charles Argento | Personal Injury

When you or a family member have suffered an injury that requires legal action, you don’t have the time not to have an attorney that has your best interest at heart—and most importantly, will deliver the best possible outcome. The team of highly experienced attorneys at Charles J. Argento & Associates have dealt with all matters of personal injury and accidents for client upon and client, and know exactly how to get you the compensation that you deserve. At the helm of the firm, with nearly three decades of experience in the field, is Charles J. Argento, who’s known for providing aggressive, cost-efficient and responsive representation.

“I’ve always been interested in trying to help people. I wanted to learn what it took for insurance companies to pay top money on cases,” says Mr. Argento, of how he came to be one of Houston’s most sought-after personal injury attorneys. After graduating from State University of New York at Buffalo, he earned his juris doctorate from South Texas College of Law.

Mr. Argento got his start in law by working directly with insurance companies for a wide range of personal injury cases. “During my first 10 years of practice, I represented people who were sued, so I learned the ins and outs of insurance companies: what their thinking was, how they evaluated a case, and what a case was worth,” he recalls. This experience ended up being deeply instrumental to Mr. Argento’s success today—and his ace in the hole. “I now have inside knowledge on what makes these companies pay, what information they need, and also the things that they’re looking for to prevent you from getting any kind of money. It is just invaluable in trying to get people the maximum money they deserve.”

At Charles J. Argento & Associates, Mr. Argento serves as lead counsel, and together with his staff of highly trained and efficient, bilingual paralegals, secretaries and clerks, works on cases involving car and truck accidents, defective products, medical device lawsuits, bad drugs, wrongful death and more. Their goal as a firm is to provide each and every client with the highest quality of legal services available.

Throughout his career, Mr. Argento has continually received recognition for his excellence by his clients, colleagues and the press. He holds two of the most prestigious ratings: “AV” by the Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory—the highest rating worldwide for legal ability and ethical standard, awarded to less than 5 percent of attorneys in the U.S.—for the past 20 consecutive years, and 10/10 by Avvo, reflecting his superb professional conduct and experience in the legal community, and providing an unmatched level of transparency, information and guidance.

On top of those honors, Mr. Argento was distinguished as the “National Top 100 Trial Attorneys” in the country; the “10 Best” in client satisfaction by the American Institute of Personal Injury attorneys; the “Top 3 Personal Injury Lawyers in Houston” by Three Best Rated; and “Houstonia Top Lawyers in Houston.” He also holds a Distinguished Justice Advocates certificate, awarded to only the top 1 percent of attorneys in America.

“Helping people that have been taken advantage of from insurance companies and big corporations is, without a doubt, the part of my job I love,” says Mr. Argento.

CHARLES J. ARGENTO
CHARLES J. ARGENTO & ASSOCIATES
1111 North Loop West, Ste. 715
Houston, TX 77008
713-225-5050
www.charlesargento.com

Walston Bowlin, LLP

August 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Top Lawyers, Walston Bowlin, LLP

Walston Bowlin, LLP | Trial Lawyers

Walston Bowlin, LLP is one of Houston’s top litigation boutiques, handling matters in Houston and across the country in places like New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. The firm represents individuals and some of the nation’s most respected international corporations alike, going toe-to-toe with the largest law firms in the United States. The firm often handles commercial litigation cases on contingency or hybrid fee arrangements. This flexibility, along with the depth and experience of the firm, makes Walston Bowlin an attractive option for clients large and small. In addition to its formidable commercial practice, the firm devotes itself to fighting for individuals injured by the negligence of others, whether in automobile accidents, workplace injuries, or products liability claims.

Walston Bowlin, LLP
920 Memorial City Way, Ste. 425
Houston, TX 77024
713-300-8700
www.walstonbowlin.com

Loren Klitsas

August 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Klitsas, Loren, Top Lawyers

Loren Klitsas | Personal Injury

Loren Klitsas, the managing partner of Klitsas, Vercher & Capps, has practiced law for 24 years, representing only victims. He and his team are proud to have settled over $200 million in cases in the history of the firm. Mr. Klitsas has worked on high profile cases such as the BP Oil Spill in 2010, the nationwide lawsuit versus Starbucks for labor violations, and has represented thousands of seriously injured people involved in catastrophic accidents. Mr. Klitsas is a member of the prestigious American Board of Trial Advocates, the Multi Million Dollar Advocates, Texas Super Lawyer, and is AV rated, the highest rating a lawyer can receive from his peers. In addition, he is past President of Texas Trial Lawyer Advocates and was Vice President of Houston Trial Lawyers.

Klitsas, Vercher & Capps, PC
550 Westcott, Ste. 570
Houston, TX 77007
713-862-1365
www.kv-law.com

Crain, Caton & James, PC

August 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Crain Caton & James, Top Lawyers

Crain, Caton & James | Wills, Trusts & Estates

Seated from left to right: Joshua R. Flores and Sarah Patel Pacheco. Standing from left to right: Chasity W. Cooper and Kathleen Tanner Beduze.

Crain, Caton & James’ Sarah Patel Pacheco and her team of H Texas “Top Lawyers” focus their practice on representing trustees, executors, beneficiaries and other individuals in complex estate, trust and fiduciary matters, including litigation and administration. Sarah is Board Certified in Estate Planning and Probate Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and the co-author of three legal treatises regarding estate, trust and guardianship matters. She is repeatedly recognized for her expertise, including being named as one of the “Top 50 Female Attorneys in Texas” by Texas Monthly magazine and Best Lawyers’ Houston Litigation – Trust & Estates “Lawyer of the Year” in 2014 and 2017. Regarded as an authority in her field, Sarah is frequently called upon to give lectures and presentations to her peers. Sarah believes that her success is attributable to her passion for this area of the law, and to assembling a team of outstanding professionals who are committed to old-fashioned hard work.

Senior Associate Chasity W. Cooper is Board Certified in Estate Planning and Probate Law, and concentrates on estate planning, administration and related tax issues, while Senior Associate Kathleen Tanner Beduze advises clients in all aspects of fiduciary, estate and trust litigation, as well as guardianship proceedings. Kathleen was named a Texas Super Lawyer Rising Star in 2016 and 2017, as well as a Top Attorney in Texas by Texas Monthly in 2016 and 2017. Associate Joshua R. Flores focuses his practice on all aspects of estate, trust and fiduciary litigation, along with business and commercial litigation. Josh was named a Texas Super Lawyer Rising Star in 2017.

Crain, Caton & James
1401 McKinney St., Ste. 1700
Houston, TX 77010
713-752-8630
www.craincaton.com

Brian Ayson

August 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Ayson, Brian, Top Lawyers

Brian Ayson | Criminal Defense

“In addition to knowing the law and being well-prepared, you also have to be able to listen to your clients,” argues Brian Ayson, the founder of Ayson Law Firm. “We are attorneys and counselors. Fighting for your clients while helping them through a difficult time is what attorneys should strive for.”

It is Ayson’s devotion to his clients, combined with his tenacity in the courtroom, that has catapulted the firm into one of the city’s up-and-coming practices for personal injury and criminal defense. The firm handles criminal cases, ranging from DWI to murder, and personal injury matters, including automobile and 18-wheeler accidents.

For Ayson, no case is too big—or too small. “I have helped many people charged with a variety of misdemeanor and felony cases,” he says. Not surprisingly, Ayson holds a Superb rating on Avvo, and has a peer-review rating of 4.5/5 on Martindale Law Directory.

Brian Ayson
Ayson Law Firm
2200 N. Loop W., Ste. 304
Houston, TX 77018
832-304-2176
www.aysonlaw.com

Dennis Slate

August 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Slate, Dennis M., Top Lawyers

Dennis Slate | Family Law

Slate-Dennis

Dennis M. Slate is one of a select few attorneys board-certified in family law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, a distinction given to less than 3 percent of Texas lawyers. Recognized for his dedication and commitment to his clients, Slate prides himself on preparing his every case to the fullest and makes himself available to clients, sometimes even on weekends. “We are truly able to provide a very high quality of legal service, and more affordably than many downtown firms,” he says.

Dennis Slate
Attorney at Law PC

DEER PARK OFFICE
112 E. Forrest Ln.
Deer Park, TX 77536
281-407-9254
www.deerparkdivorcelawyers.com

PEARLAND OFFICE
1920 Country Place Pkwy., Ste. 354
Pearland, TX 77584
281-410-5780
www.pearlanddivorceattorney.com

Foodie Getaway at Rancho Pescadero, July 6-9

June 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Travel Blog

Rancho Pescadero in the artsy, laid-back beach town of Todos Santos, Mexico is hosting a fun and food-filled Guest Chef Series over July 6-9 for foodies around the world. Nestled on a pristine beach of the Pacific Ocean an hour north of Cabo San Lucas and a world away from the everyday, Rancho Pescadero’s weekend-long Guest Chef Series culinary event will feature the talented Jason Dady.

The executive chef / owner is behind the restaurant concepts Tre Trattoria, Tre Enoteca, Two Bros. BBQ Market, The DUK Truck, B&D Icehouse, Shuck Shack, and Dady Premier Catering in San Antonio, TX. He was awarded “Star Chef Restaurateur” by Star Chefs and was a semi-finalist nomination by James Beard.

The full weekend starts with a cooking demo and farm-to-table lunch followed by a traditional tequila and mezcal tasting. The next day entails a Baja wine tasting followed by a dinner of the guest chef’s tasting menu in the resort’s signature restaurant, the Garden Restaurant. Rancho Pescadero sources ingredients for these meals from its on-property organic farm and local purveyors in a 20-mile radius, making each meal extremely fresh and full of flavor. The Baja-specific farm-to-table are sure to delight culinary connoisseurs and casual foodies alike.

For more information, visit http://ranchopescadero.com/special-offers/guest-chef-series.

Billy Cheong, DC

May 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Cheong, Billy, DC, Top Docs

Billy Cheong, DC
Chiropractic

Elite Spine and Health Center is a full-service chiropractic and rehabilitation facility, specializing in sports medicine and whiplash-related injuries. Dr. Billy Cheong and his team go beyond adjustments and soft tissue treatments, implementing a functional approach that’s supplemented by the industry’s most cutting-edge treatments: Graston, myofascial release (MFR), KinesioTape/RockTape, electrotherapy, traction, custom orthotic fittings, in-house testing of Nerve Conduction Velocity (NCV) and spinal ultrasounds. “Each person who walks into our office, whether they have a neurological, muscular or skeletal condition, is going to receive specialized care that is tailored to them. We strive to make each and every patient feel the difference after treatment, whether that means less pain, being able to enjoy time with kids or living an overall healthier lifestyle,” says Dr. Cheong.

Dr. Cheong started his chiropractic career working alongside the head chiropractor of the Houston Texans and Astros, and now leads one of the top chiropractic offices in Houston.

 

Billy Cheong, DC
Elite Spine & Health Center

2901 Wilcrest Dr., Ste. 140
Houston, TX 77042
832-925-6004
www.elitespinehouston.com

Sandhya J. Prashad, MD

Sandhya J. Prashad, MD
Psychiatry

“Ketamine therapy is helping the best of me shine while quieting the thoughts and anxiety that can so often be self-defeating. It has, quite simply, been life-changing.”—Jack, patient

Major depression, bipolar disorder and PTSD can greatly impact one’s life. Waiting weeks for a medication to work, or finding that it doesn’t work at all, can be a frustrating process. Dr. Prashad felt dissatisfied with the relatively ineffective available treatments with burdensome side effects for patients with these disorders. She became interested in IV ketamine because of the robust, rapid effects and lack of side effects between treatments, and founded Houston Ketamine Therapeutics to offer this cutting-edge treatment. With an 83 percent success rate—and depression lifted sometimes as quickly as one hour—no other treatment for severe depression offers such impressive results.

Dr. Prashad is a board-certified psychiatrist, who completed both medical school and residency at Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Prashad’s goal is to truly understand the needs of her patients, and to address the multiple contributing factors in order to reach the highest level of success. Her patients describe her as compassionate, insightful and approachable, and 100 percent dedicated to doing everything in her power to help them achieve their goals.


Sandhya J. Prashad, MD

Houston Ketamine Therapeutics
6565 West Loop South, Ste. 530
Bellaire, TX 77401
832-436-4055
www.houstonketaminetherapy.com

Diagnostic Eye Center

May 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Diagnostic Eye Center, Top Docs

Diagnostic Eye Center

Aric Welton, OD, Marc Sanders, MD, FACS, Stephanie Lozano, OD, Andrew Salem, MD

For nearly 20 years, the doctors of Diagnostic Eye Center have been committed to providing the most advanced eyecare in Houston, along with an unparalleled dedication to customer service. With a focus on compassion and communication, Diagnostic Eye Center offers a personalized experience for every patient.

Drs. Marc Sanders and Andrew Salem are board certified ophthalmologists who are at the forefront of the rapidly expanding field of vision correction. They offer the latest advancements in custom bladeless cataract and LASIK surgery, focusing on each patient’s individual goals and lifestyle needs. Their commitment to excellence is reflected in their countless patient referrals and outstanding reviews.

Optometrists Drs. Aric Welton and Stephanie Lozano specialize in surgical co-management, as well as the treatment of glaucoma and dry eye. Their expertise also extends to complex contact lens fittings.

Patients can count on comprehensive eye care at Diagnostic Eye Center, from routine complete eye exams and glasses to sophisticated procedures such as corneal transplants, Intacs, and collagen crosslinking.

We are conveniently located in the River Oaks area and offer same day appointments. Our on-site optical shop carries a wide selection of glasses. The doctors and staff welcome the opportunity to address all your eyecare needs.

DIAGNOSTIC EYE CENTER
3405 Edloe St., Ste. 300
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Fogo de Chão’s New BarFogo Menu

May 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Dining, Entertainment

Fogo de Chão, the upscale chain of Brazilian steakhouses, has always primarily been an all-you-can-eat meat, sit-down churrasco dinner. Meals are usually full-service, as diners sample different meats roasted gaucho style (meaning cooked over an open fire) and carved table side. While none of that will change, On April 25th, the restaurant introduced their new, expanded bar menu—and it’s fabulous.

The new “BarFogo” menu features small Brazilian plates that allow patrons to eat at the bar rather than partake in the full Fogo churrasco dinner experience, if they prefer. Menu items include braised beef rib sliders, jumbo cocktail shrimp, Brazilian empanadas, and crispy parmesan polenta fries. No question about it—the bar menu “bites” are delicious and can be entire meals in and of themselves.

Craft caipirinhas and South American-inspired cocktails are also new at the bar, with names like “Flor de Fresca” ( a delicious blend of Argentinian gin, grapefruit, and honey) and “Brazilian Gentleman” (a tempting mixture of Bourbon and passion fruit). The Mango Habanero Caipirinha is a must-have for chile lovers, and the recipe is featured below courtesy of Fogo de Chão.

For the full BarFogo menu, click here. https://fogodechao.com/menu/bar-fogo

Grin and Bear It

March 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

WACO – “A vodka, straight, please,” I say. The bartender springs into action. This is most unusual because I am on the campus of Baylor University, the nation’s largest Baptist school, noted for no booze, no smoking and – until recently — no dancing. Oh, and known for an on-going scandal about gang rapes and football players. This is the new (2014) football stadium, originally named Baylor Stadium but changed to Drayton McLane Stadium after a huge gift from the alumni who sold the Houston Astros for $680 million. Also, and this I didn’t know, the City of Waco kicked in $30 million. Wonder if College Station or Austin did the same for their universities?

For the money, Baylor has built what may be the best football stadium in America. This place is spiffy enough that there is a fancy social event being held here, at the same time a wedding rehearsal dinner is underway on another level. Maybe there is hope for the Astrodome. Ah, but what about liquor? A bartender explains that only suite renters can have booze. The big donors call in their order a week or two before the game, the booze is taken to the suite and locked up until kickoff. No other alcohol is allowed in, and to think that UT is now selling beer at sporting events. Some may call this “hypocrisy.” I call it “doing business.”

While we’re here, let’s take a look at Texas’ oldest university, which has one of the Lone Star State’s more interesting collegiate stories. Willie Nelson went here for one year, majoring in animal science and joining Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, then dropped out to become a musician and was never heard from again. Interesting note: a Baylor alumni publication put Willie on its cover, but the Baptist elders did not approve of someone who had been married three times and busted for pot four times. I believe the magazine was killed. Other students included Govs. Ann Richards, Price Daniel and Mark White (more Texas governors are from Baylor than any other school). Also, Sul Ross, Sam Houston’s son, Temple Lea Houston (Sam gave the first $5,000 to the school) and my father. I couldn’t afford $5,000 so I donated Dad’s 1926 baseball letter sweater and team photo to the school which was putting in an athletic museum. Later I inquired about the sweater and photo. They couldn’t find them.

Baylor, which opened in 1845 in the long-forgotten town of Independence, is not only the oldest continuously-operating university in Texas but one of the first higher educational institutions west of the Mississippi River. When the railroad bypassed Independence, Baylor moved to that wild town of Waco. The school was named for one of its founders, Robert E.B. Baylor, who helped write the state constitution and favored baring clergy from holding public office. It is a private school in the Big XII, so no legislative cash. Baylor’s motto, appearing on its seal, is Pro Ecclesia, Pro Texana (For Church, for Texas) although Bondus Freedonia (Out on Bail) might fit better. The 1,000-acre campus sits on the banks of the Brazos River. UT-Austin sits on the banks of Waller Creek. UH-Downtown overlooks Buffalo Bayou. Its student body numbers about 16,700. Its colors are not black-and-white stripes nor jump-suit orange, but green and gold. Their song is “That Good Ol’ Baylor Line,” to the tune of “In the Good Old Summertime.” My theory is the Bears noticed at a football game with the Longhorns, the Teasips were singing “I’ve Been Working on the Railroad.” That inspired Baylor to adopt “Summer Time.” Actually, according to sources I have copied, in 1906, a student penned humorous words to the tune of “In the Good Old Summer Time” and they became generally accepted among the student body as the school’s fight song. However, in 1931 the wife of a Baylor music professor felt the words “were neither dignified enough nor representative of the total university,” so she wrote new lyrics, which were soon adopted as the official school song.

Baylor has played Texas A&M in football 108 times, beginning in 1899. No more. However, those games produced one of the saddest stories in college football. According to my thorough research, Wikipedia, the 1926 game was in played in Waco and was Baylor’s homecoming. During halftime Baylor homecoming floats paraded around the field. When a car pulling a flatbed trailer with several female Baylor students neared the Texas A&M Corps of Cadets’ section, a cadet raced towards the car and grabbed the steering wheel. The motion caused Louise Normand to fall off the truck, injuring her and inciting a large riot. Students began using metal folding chairs and planks of wood that had been used as yard markers for weapons. Texas A&M cadet Lt. Charles Sessums was hit in the head and, although he initially appeared to recover, he died following the game. The two school presidents agreed to temporarily suspend athletic relations between the schools. They did not compete against each other in any athletic event for the next four years. Baylor and Texas A&M would not meet in football again until 1931.

For years, the Baylor football team was the doormat of the Southwest Conference. The Bears didn’t win a Southwest Conference championship for 50 years (1924-1974). That was a longer time span than between Baylor’s 1924 championship and Custer’s Last Stand. Then there is the tale of yet another apparent at-home Bear defeat. They were down three touchdowns in the fourth quarter, and the Baylor fans started leaving. Then the Bears scored, and again, and once more. Departing fans listening to the game on their car radio did a U-turn to go back to the stadium, but met nose-to-nose with later leavers. There was a gigantic traffic snarl. I don’t know who won. Anyway, the Bears will get out of their current mess. Don’t leave the game early, and I’ll drink to that.

 

Ashby is toasting at ashby2@comcast.net

Have a Ball

January 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Events

Super Bowl Live at Discovery Green brings the fun (and food!) for football and non-football fans alike.

Super Bowl LI is coming to Discovery Green…and that means 10 days of free food, music, games and—last but not least—football. Dubbed “Super Bowl LIVE,” the festival will run from January 27 through February 5, and is expected to draw an even larger crowd than San Francisco’s 1.1 million for last year’s Bowl.

The Houston Super Bowl Host Committee is on a mission to make Super Bowl LIVE more memorable than ever, showcasing the best Houston has to offer. In addition to musical and theatrical performances, the festival will feature the Future Flight Experience, a virtual-reality ride that will include real photos of Mars from NASA’s rover missions and a 90-foot drop “back to earth”— just in time for kickoff at Super Bowl LI.

For more information, visit www.housuperbowl.com


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Top Lawyers

July 28, 2016 by  
Filed under Top Lawyers

Food Network Star, At Your Service

July 27, 2016 by  
Filed under Dining, Features

By Tom Flynn
Photography by Erin Wiese

Gordon Bethune and Laurette listen as Chef Jeff entertains the dinner guests.

Gordon Bethune and Laurette listen as Chef Jeff entertains the dinner guests.


Vegas’ bad boy of cuisine, Chef Jeff Henderson, flies into Bush Intercontinental Airport, where I await in passenger pickup. “I’m at door C-101,” he texts. “Black guy with a bald head.” Many black gentlemen with bald heads exit C-101 and wonder why I’m waving at them before one recognizes my white SUV and red shirt, and heads my way. After quick introductions, I ask, “Can you be a little more descriptive next time? Like, I’m a tall black guy with a black chef’s shirt and designer luggage.” This is the beginning of Shop, Chop, Cook and Eat, the Chef Jeff Experience.

The 6’2” Henderson has a history. His first career in sales earned him $35,000 a week, and a 19-year sentence in a federal institution. Henderson was never a user, just a seller from the Los Angeles projects. During his extended vacation from mainstream American life, Henderson did a lot of soul searching, realized he was not a victim, took responsibility for his actions and then decided to learn how to cook. Before he finished his parole, Chef Jeff had cooked his way through L.A.’s best restaurants and landed a job in Las Vegas at Caesar’s Palace, where he was voted Las Vegas’ Buffet Chef of the Year. He moved on to head chef at the prestigious Café Bellagio, the first African American to hold that position. Then he wrote a New York Times best-selling book about his life, appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show and with Steve Harvey, starred in his own Food Network TV show and became a prolific public speaker.

Now he’s riding shotgun in my SUV as we head to Central Market. This is my Christmas present from my wife, the Chef Jeff Experience. We’ll be working side by side to cook a four-course gourmet meal for six. It turns out we have a lot in common. We’re both in our 50s, have three-year olds (him, one girl; me, two identical boys), extended careers in sales (mine, legal) and public speaking, and both love cooking and our wives. Whatever earned his bad-boy reputation is long gone, and we’re looking forward to having some fun.

I love grocery stores. Between 1977 and 1984, I worked every position from sacker to store manager—it was my first career. I still study how shelves and displays are set as I walk the Montrose area H-E-B and Disco Kroger. Part of the Chef Jeff Experience is learning to navigate a store and select the best ingredients. Ten minutes into our trip, he confesses a little frustration; I know this Central Market better than he does. “No worries, Chef. I know the store in your neighborhood better than you do, and I’ve never been there,” I reply. But the big guy has a presence, and a lot of heads turn as my famous new friend selects fresh fruits and veggies, along with jumbo lump crab meat, sea bass and a rack of lamb.

He is a little distant on the ride from the store to the house, and I realize he’s thinking of the magnitude of his task. He’s walking into a kitchen he has never seen, with a guy he just met, to produce a meaningful culinary experience for six people who are showing up in a few hours with high expectations. Wow! He has little clues of the appliances, utensils or pantry goods available. I ask him why he stresses himself out like this. “I left the Café Bellagio 28 days after appearing on Oprah and became a public speaker. This project keeps me in the kitchen and keeps me cooking,” he says.

And he’s in luck. We have a large, gorgeous kitchen with every gadget and pantry item a chef could need. He becomes the general of our two-man army, requesting stations for each dish on the menu and setting up a restaurant-style assembly line in my home kitchen. My first prep task is cutting corn off the cobs. “What’s next, Chef?” “You’ve got to do every ear,” he replies. “I did.” It goes the same way with the potatoes. He looks at my work, and lets out a chuckle and a little sigh of relief. “I didn’t know you had good hands. We’ve got plenty of time.”

Chef Jeff’s photographer shows up before mine (again, we have a lot in common) and starts documenting our progress. They sneak out to the store and come back with flowers; I get a vase. “We don’t need a vase, these are for us. We’re going to add some class to these pictures,” says Chef. We break the flowers down and put a little Mason jar filled with tulips at each workstation. I’m in the middle of chopping sausage for our crab chowder, when Chef asks me to join him at the stove. “You ready, Bobby?” he asks his photographer, now turned videographer. Without warning, Chef puts his arm around my shoulders and turns from being a contemplative chef into the Food Network star. “Hey, all right y’all, Chef Jeff here with my friend Tom in his mac daddy kitchen in Houston, Texas, cooking up some amazing…” Next thing I know, I’m being interviewed about travels and culinary experiences in front of a live camera!

The chef and Food Network star becomes host, server and entertainer as our guests arrive and sit for dinner, sharing his life lessons between courses. The food is phenomenal, the experience one of a kind. And it never really ends.

You can learn more about Shop, Chop, Cook and Eat, the Chef Jeff Experience by visiting www.chefjefflive.com. But for now, check out the recipes here.

Screen Shot 2016-07-26 at 2.57.09 PM


STARTER: Watermelon Cube with Minted Citrus Salad
(Serves 6)

WatermelonCube1 cup water
1 cup white sugar
12 mint leaves
½ kiwi, peeled and diced
½ peach, peeled and diced
½ Meyer lemon, peeled and segmented
8 strawberries, cored and diced
½ cup fig-infused balsamic vinegar
6–8 (1-inch) cubes chilled seedless watermelon

1. Make a simple syrup: Combine the water and sugar in a small pot and bring to a simmer while stirring, until the sugar dissolves, about 8–10 minutes. Poor the syrup into an 8-ounce jar and let cool; reserve the remaining syrup for the dessert.
2. Roughly chop the mint leaves, wrap in cheesecloth and tie with butcher’s twine. Add the mint bundle to the syrup, secure with a lid and refrigerate overnight.
3. Add the diced kiwi, peaches, lemon and strawberries to a small bowl and let stand so the flavors blend.
4. Add the vinegar to a 10-inch sauté pan over low-medium and reduce by half or until the desired thickness is achieved. Remove from the heat and let cool.
5. Cut small cavities in the watermelon cubes, about ¼-inch deep, using a sharp knife or small melon-ball scoop. Add a little dollop of the fruit mixture atop each watermelon cube. Drizzle with ½ teaspoon minted simple syrup.

Plate it Perfectly: Dip a small pastry brush into the reduced balsamic and paint a stripe on each plate. Place a watermelon cube in the center of each stripe. Top with a sliver or 2 of julienned mint leaves.


Appetizer: Louisiana Lump Crab–Sausage Chowder
(Serves 6–8)

1 stick unsalted butter, plus 2 tablespoons, divided
1 pound smoked turkey or hot pork sausage, cut into ¼-inch cubes
½ cup all-purpose flour
½ yellow onion, diced
3 celery ribs, diced
½ green bell pepper, diced
½ jalapeño, seeded and minced
3 tablespoons minced garlic
Salt and black pepper to taste
¼ cup Riesling wine
2 (8-ounce) bottles clam juice
2 (32-ounce) containers low-sodium chicken stock
2 bay leaves
1½ cups heavy whipping cream
1 pound jumbo lump crabmeat, cleaned
Cajun seasoning to taste
½ cup oyster crackers for garnish
1 tablespoon finely chopped chives for garnish
Crab-chowder2 tablespoons grated Manchego or Parmesan cheese for garnish

1. Melt 1 stick butter in a stockpot over medium. Add the sausage and continue stirring until caramelized. Add the flour and stir constantly until the flour begins to turn brown. Add the vegetables and garlic, cooking until softened. Season with a nice pinch of salt and pepper.
2. Slowly stream in the wine, clam juice and chicken stock and add the bay leaves, stirring constantly to dissolve the flour mixture. Bring to boil, then reduce the heat and simmer uncovered for 35–45 minutes, or until slightly thickened.
3. Add the heavy whipping cream and simmer for 12–15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.
4. Meanwhile, brown the remaining butter in a sauté pan over medium. Gently fold in the crabmeat and sauté until warm. Add Cajun seasoning to taste.

Plate it Perfectly:
Ladle the soup into bowls, garnish with oyster crackers and chives; top with big lumps of crap and freshly grated cheese.


Main Course: Herb-Encrusted Rack of Lamb
(Serves 4–6)

1 (6-bone) rack of lamb, trimmed and Frenched
Kosher salt and black pepper for rubbing
Cajun Seasoning for rubbing
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup Italian breadcrumbs
1 tablespoon freshly minced rosemary
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 cloves garlic, minced
rack-lamb
1. Liberally season the lamb with salt, pepper and Cajun seasoning.
2. Heat the olive oil in large cast-iron skillet over medium-high and sear the lamb until all sides are golden. Remove from the heat and set aside for 1 hour.
3. Preheat the oven to 375°F.
4. Combine the breadcrumbs and rosemary in a small bowl and set aside.
5. Rub the fat cap of the lamb with the mustard and garlic, then pack with the breadcrumb mixture.
6. Bake until the internal temperature reaches 118°F–120°F, slightly past medium-rare. Let rest for 15 minutes and cut into individual chops.


Main Course: Barbecue Chip–Encrusted Chilean Sea Bass
(Serves 6)

1 (3-pound) Chilean sea bass fillet
3 tablespoons olive oil, plus more as needed
Kosher salt and black pepper to taste
8 ounces barbecue kettle chips
2–3 tablespoons olive oil

SeaBass1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Cut the fillet into 6 pieces and remove the skin and lingering bones.
2. Heat the oil in a cast-iron skillet over medium-high. Working in batches, sear the fillets, until the bottom sides are brown and crispy. Meanwhile, season the top sides with salt and pepper.
3. Remove from the heat and let rest on a paper towel–lined plate, crispy side up.
4. Place the chips in a food processor and grind to a breadcrumb texture. Using a pastry brush, paint the seared sides of the fillets with olive oil and top with the chip crumbs.
5. Transfer the fillets to a baking pan and bake for 12–15 minutes, or until desired doneness. Remove from the oven and set aside.

Pair it Perfectly:
Cote du Rhone Blanc


Main Course: Corn and Bacon Maque Choux
(Serves 6–8)

choux½ pound thick-cut smoked bacon, diced
10 fingerling potatoes, quartered
1 large carrot, peeled and small diced
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more if needed
1½ tablespoons freshly minced garlic
½ yellow onion, diced
3 celery ribs, diced
½ green bell pepper, diced
½ yellow bell pepper, diced
1 jalapeño, seeded and diced
6 baby portabella mushrooms, stemmed and quartered
5 ears corn on the cob, kernels removed
1 bunch Swiss chard or collard greens, cut into 1-inch pieces
¼ cup chicken stock
Salt and black pepper to taste
Parsley sprigs for garnish

1. In large sauté pan, cook the bacon over medium-high until caramelized. Add the potatoes and carrots and cook until they begin to brown.
2. Add the butter, garlic and remaining vegetables and cook for 8–10 minutes, stirring often until desired doneness is achieved. Add the chicken stock. Season with salt and pepper.

Plate it Perfectly: Neatly place 1⁄3 cup maque choux in the center of each plate. Top with sea bass, then prop the lamb chop against the fish, bone pointing up. Garnish with parsley sprigs.


Dessert: Citrus Berry Parfait
(Serves 6–8)
parfait
½ quart heavy whipping cream
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 pint strawberries, hulled and diced
½ pint blueberries
1 orange, zested
¾ cup simple syrup (see watermelon starter recipe)
¼ Angel food cake, medium diced
8 ounces candied pecans or walnuts, roughly chopped
Mint leaves for garnish

1. Place a glass or stainless-steel bowl and the carton of whipping cream in the freezer for 30 minutes.
2. Pour the cream into the chilled bowl and add the honey, sugar and cinnamon. Whip with a wire whisk, until soft peaks form.
3. Combine the fruit and zest in a medium bowl and add the simple syrup; toss gently.

Plate it Perfectly: Make parfaits by layering the fruit mixture, angel food cake, chopped nuts and whipped cream in 8-ounce mason jars. Top with whipped cream and mint leaves. Serve with long spoons.

Much Ado About Houston

July 26, 2016 by  
Filed under Entertainment, Events, Holiday, Theater

Summer in Houston isn’t complete without a little theater. And what could be better than the “merry war” between Benedict and Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing, or the tragic underdog tale in Henry V, to take the edge off those steamy August nights?

Photo courtesy of the Miller Outdoor Theatre.

Photo courtesy of the Miller Outdoor Theatre.

Beginning on July 29, the Houston Shakespeare Festival will alternate performances of Much Ado About Nothing and Henry V over the course of two weeks, once again captivating Bayou City theatergoers at Hermann Park’s Miller Outdoor Theatre. Since 1975, audiences from all over the city have enjoyed the event, watching Shakespeare under the stars for free every summer. Funding from the University of Houston, as well as several other foundations and individuals, has allowed the HSF to continue and grow, even providing an opportunity for emerging actors, designers, directors and stage managers from the HSF Conservatory to practice their craft in a professional environment.

Don’t miss the show!

Much Ado About Nothing: July 29, 31; August 2, 4, 6

Henry V: July 30; August 3, 5, 7

For ticket and pricing information:
www.milleroutdoortheatre.com


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