Dining Out 4 Life: April 27, 2017

March 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Dining

For one day in April – Thursday, April 27, 2017 – Houston-area restaurants are donating a percentage of sales to AIDS Foundation Houston (AFH)through their participation in the annual nationwide event, Dining Out for Life. Gillman Subaru is the presenting sponsor for this year’s event, which is hosted by chairs Michael Pearce, Jessica Rossman and Travis Torrence. Guests can support AIDS Foundation Houston by enjoying breakfast, lunch or dinner throughout the day at one of more than 40 participating restaurants (and counting). A portion of the proceeds support AFH’s programs and services that help thousands of Houstonians living with HIV/AIDS and reduce the number of new HIV infections.“Every year we’re humbled by the outpouring of support that we receive from chefs, restaurants and diners in our community,” said Kelly Young, Chief Executive Officer of AIDS Foundation Houston. “We’re working to end HIV/AIDS, and Dining Out for Life helps raise funds and awareness that push us closer to our goal.”In 1991, an ActionAIDS volunteer in Philadelphia created Dining Out for Life. Now the event is produced in 60 cities throughout the United States and Canada, with more than 3,000 restaurants donating a portion of their proceeds from their designated day of dining. AIDS Foundation Houston has participated in the event since the inaugural year, raising thousands of dollars in support thanks to a mandate that ensures funds raised locally stay local. The 2017 participating restaurants offer something for everyone.

 

As of March 27, 2017, participating restaurants include:

America’s – River Oaks (2040 West Gray)

B&B Butchers & Restaurant

Barnaby’s Cafe – Downtown (801 Congress) Barnaby’s Cafe – Heights (2802 White Oak) Barnaby’s Cafe – River Oaks (1701 S. Shepherd)  Barnaby’s Cafe – Memorial (5750 Woodway) Barnaby’s Cafe – Midtown (414 West Gray) Barnaby’s Cafe – Museum District (1801 Binz) The Original Barnaby’s (604 Fairview) Baby Barnaby’s

Beck’s Prime – Memorial Park  Beck’s Prime – the Heights

Bollo Woodfired Pizza Canopy

Charivari Restaurant

El Real El Tiempo – Montrose (1308 Montrose) El Tiempo – Westheimer (322 Westheimer) El Tiempo – Navigation (2814 Navigation)

EQ Heights

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse – River Oaks (2405 W Alabama)

Ginger & Fork

Harold’s Restaurant

Bar & Terrace Krisp Bird & Batter L

aurenzo’s Bar & Grill Laurenzo’s Restaurant

Le Colonial Houston

Lucille’s

Niko Niko’s – Montrose (2520 Montrose) Niko Niko’s – Memorial (1040 W Sam Houston Parkway)

Pi Pizza

Rainbow Lodge

Reef

Shade

Songkran Thai Kitchen

Starfish

State Fare

Tacos A Go Go – Oak Forest (3401 W TC Jester) Tacos A Go Go – Midtown (3704 Main) Tacos A Go Go – Heights (2912 White Oak)

The Raven Grill

Tony Mandola’s

For more information and the current restaurant list, visit www.AIDSHelp.org.

A LEAGUE OF OUR OWN

March 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

Play ball! Yes, the baseball season is upon us once more. The Lone Star grudge match between Dallas and Houston was always a good one, and when the Fort Worth Cats took on the Dallas Eagles, after seven or so innings and as many beers, there were fist fights in the stands. For you youngsters and newcomers, Texas baseball in air-conditioned stadiums with huge scoreboards and suites with bars and toilets are a relative new way of seeing and playing America’s game. I am talking about the Texas League which, along with Southwest Conference football games, united and divided the state like nothing since the Civil War (or the War for Southern Independence as my grandmother called the Late Unpleasantness).

But whatever happened to the old Texas League? Actually, it is still going strong, packing in fans. Since its founding in 1888 as the Texas State Baseball League, this organization has become one of the most colorful and historic minor leagues in America. And the bat goes on. Today on summer evenings in their field of dreams, young men on their way up to the Bigs, play ball.

The players compete in 140 games, about 20 shy of what the major league teams play. Each Texas League team is affiliated with a major league team which pays the players’ salaries, about $1,800 a month during the season, along with the salaries of the coaches, managers and trainers, plus some costs for the equipment. In turn, the teams send part of their gate receipts to Major League Baseball. This financial arrangement allows for one of the great bargains in professional sports. Ticket prices in most of the league’s stadiums go for about $10 to $20 with general admission as low as $2, and parking is usually free.

The Texas League is Class AA, a level that many in player development consider the make or break level of the minor leagues. If a player performs well in the Texas League, he has a fair chance to play, some day, in the major leagues. Then there are the stadiums. Build it and they will score runs. In Class AA, there must be at least 6,000 seats in each stadium. (Corpus Christi’s Whataburger Field was named by USA Today among the top 10 minor league parks in the nation.) Many of the league’s parks also feature grassy knolls beyond the outfield where families can spread out a blanket and lie down to watch the games.

Over its 129 years, the host towns have changed with just the San Antonio Missions hanging in there from the beginning. Today the league is divided into North and South. The northern bunch is made up of the Springfield, Missouri, Cardinals, Northwest Arkansas Naturals (I guess they liked the movie), Arkansas Travelers and Tulsa Drillers. The south consists of the Corpus Christi Hooks, San Antonio Missions, Midland RockHounds and Frisco RoughRiders. (Last season the RoughRiders adopted a Teddy Roosevelt-style uniform – bully for them.) Through the first century of the circuit’s operation, 38 cities in eight states hosted Texas League teams. And including other leagues, in Texas alone, 101 cities — more than in any other state — have supported minor league franchises. (Incidentally, the Sugar Land Skeeters are in the independent Atlantic League. Those teams are concentrated on the East Coast, except for Sugar Land.) Towns and cities that have fielded Texas League teams range alphabetically from Albuquerque to Wichita Falls, geographically from Kansas to the Rio Grande Valley, but they have always kept the same league name, maybe because it is one of the oldest minor leagues in the nation. By 1994 only three Texas cities, San Antonio, El Paso, and Midland, were part of the eight-team league, and there have been only 15 years in which the Texas League has had an exclusively Texan makeup throughout the season.

I love some of their names: the Ardmore Territorians (this was in 1904 — Oklahoma didn’t become a state until 1907), Dallas Hams, Houston Babies. Longview Cannibals, Paris Parisians, Sherman Orphans, Temple Boll Weevils and Texarkana Casket Makers. A side note about a former member of the Texas League which moved up to AAA, the Round Rock Express. Nolan Ryan was pitching for the Houston Astros, and sport writers, always looking for a stale nickname (Little Miss Baby Cakes, Pinstripes, Hammer of Thor) fiddled with the name “Ryan.” Ryan’s Daughter didn’t work, but Houston novelist David Westheimer had written a thriller book, “Von Ryan’s Express,” so Nolan (Lynn) Ryan became Ryan’s Express or just the Express. When he got involved, businesswise, with the Round Rock minor league team, the name followed. Good thing Westheimer didn’t write “Ryan’s Casket Makers.”

In 1930 Katy Park in Waco became one of the first stadiums in organized baseball to install lights for night games. When Fort Worth’s LaGrave Field was rebuilt in 1950 following a fire, it was the first new baseball park to include a television booth. Over the years, fans witnessed players such as Tris Speaker, Hank Greenberg, “Dizzy” Dean, Duke Snider, Frank Robinson and Brooks Robinson. One player, Homer Rainey, became president of The University of Texas. John Alton “Al” Benton, later, in the majors, gave up home runs to both Babe Ruth and Mickey Mantle. Johnny Berardino, San Antonio’s second-baseman in 1938, later starred as Dr. Hardy on General Hospital. Earlier, as a child actor, he appeared in several episodes of Our Gang. More recently there were stars like Fernando Valenzuela, Orel Hershiser, Joe Morgan and Darryl Strawberry. The Astros’ dugout was a Texas League reunion with Lance Berkman, Roy Oswalt and Brad Lidge.

Finally, a hit ball that drops safely between the infield and the outfield for a single is called a “Texas Leaguer,” or used to be. We don’t hear that term much anymore. But maybe we will if Field of Dreams ever comes to town and the Cats and the Eagles go at it again.

 

Ashby plays ball at ashby2@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sugar Land Wine & Food Affair

March 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Dining, Events

Located in Fort Bend County, which is the most ethnically diverse county in America, the Sugar Land Wine & Food Affair focuses on the untold stories of the region’s melting pot of African, Asian, Latino, European and Southwestern flavors that are drawing attention from food and drink lovers from around the country. By partnering with leading regional and national culinary talent, expanding the weekend’s educational programming and adding curated dinners and events, Sugar Land is poised to showcase why the region is gaining a reputation as the next global food mecca.
Sugar Land Wine & Food Affair includes:

1) Dinners & Events – from unique seated dinner experiences to a meat-lovers lunch, these new dinners and events will educate, entertain and delight attendees:
·         The Boiling Point – Thursday, April 6 | 7:30pm

Double, Double Boil and Bubble … seafood lovers delight! The seafood boil is a long-standing southern tradition that showcases the freshest local shellfish and ingredients while bringing together community. Most notable are the Cajun crawfish boils from Louisiana and the shrimp boils of the Low Country, but boil fever has taken over most coastal towns throughout the South. Join Chefs David Bancroft (AL), Bryan Caswell (TX), and Edward Lee (KY), as they put their own spin on the boil, including Bryan’s hit Texan BBQ blue crabs. No boil is complete without refreshing libations specially selected to tame the spice … so guests can “Keep Calm & Boil On!” But there’s more ya’ll! The evening will boil down with Texas’ own “Sugar Fairy,” Rebecca Masson, and her magical confectionaries. Adding to the sweetness, a portion of proceeds from this dinner will benefit the Southern Salt Foundation.
·         The Italian Invasion: Italy and the Rest of the World – Thursday, April 6 | 7:30pm

Prepare for your palate to be blitzed by bold and vigorous Italian wine served alongside equally exhilarating wines from the rest of the world in this ultimate oenophile’s match up. Guests will play judge as these wines (identities concealed) battle course by course on a culinary tour showcasing Italian regional specialties prepared by Chef Andrew Curren (TX). In true “dolce vita” fashion, we’ll dine alfresco in the Piazza (aka: Sugar Land Town Square). Hosted by Master Sommeliers, Craig Collins and Drew Hendricks, you are sure to leave feeling that “La Vita e Bella!”
·         Cured & Fermented Lunch at Bacon Bros. Public House – Friday, April 7 | 12:00pm – 2:00pm

Explore the art and science of curing and fermentation which began long before refrigeration to preserve food.. To this day, hunters, gatherers, chefs and cooks around the globe use salt, brine, smoke and mold in everything from salumi and charcuterie to kimchi, kraut, yogurt, cheese and pickles. Chefs Kevin Ouzts (GA) and Joseph Zerwas (TX) will educate and enchant you at a family-style lunch showcasing this age-old art! Author and Sommelier, Jason Tesauro (VA), will host and select the perfect beverage pairings.

2) Learning Experiences – Friday, April 7 | 3:00pm-4:15pm, Saturday, April 8 | 10:00am – 11:00am and 11:30am – 12:30pm
·         Experience entertaining and delectable tastings of cocktails, wines as well as food and beverage pairings, all led by award-winning chefs, mixologists, distillers and sommeliers.

4) The Grand Tasting – Friday, April 7 | 7:30pm – 10:00pm
·         Delight in mouthwatering creations from top culinary superstars from both near and far, perfectly paired with the most delightful libations. Beverage-focused, the offerings will showcase Roses, Killer B’s (Boudreaux, Burgundy, Brunello, etc.), Bubbles and Crafts (spirits and beers). Held in the elegant ballroom of the Sugar Land Marriott Town Square, this exquisite tasting is a night not to be missed. Meanwhile, The Grand Auction, benefiting the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel & Restaurant Management, will offer guests the chance to bid on exclusive items as they indulge.
3) Sip & Stroll – Saturday, April 8 | 3:00pm – 6:00pm and Sunday, April 9 | 11:00am – 2:00pm

·         Eat, drink, savor and stroll at this all-you-can-indulge experience, the Sugar Land Wine & Food Affair’s popular Sip & Stroll is back again with an expanded schedule and a deliciously curated experience. Eat, drink and enjoy fantastic bites from the area’s best restaurants, carefully crafted cocktails and a great selection of wines. Ale aficionados won’t want to miss the exciting beer garden. Cheers to that!

Sugar Land Wine & Food Affair was founded and produced in 2003 by the Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce and benefits the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management. For tickets, the full lineup and more information, please visit SugarLandWineandFood Affair.com.

TEXAS, THE RANKEST STATE

March 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

By Lynn Ashby                                                           13 March 2017

TEXAS, THE RANKEST STATE

 

Texas, our Texas, all hail the not-so-mighty state that, compared to the other 49 dwarfs, is strictly mediocre to awful. We rank 30th in health care, near the bottom in opportunity. Who says so? US News & World Reports or USNWR, that’s who. It’s the magazine which annually rates universities. The winners say they deserve it. Those schools down the list say the rankings are meaningless. So let’s say these new state rankings – the first such comparisons by the magazine — are meaningless. How did USNWR come to these silly conclusions? It evaluated all 50 states across a range of criteria, from education to infrastructure and economy, then drew on thousands of data points to capture how states best serve their citizens. So this is not a survey of us, the citizens, but of how our state government serves us. And to think, our Legislature is currently all knotted up over transgenders in school bathrooms.

Which state ranks which No. 1 overall in the Best States rankings and who is No. 50? Well, Texans used to say, “Thank God for Mississippi,” because, otherwise, we would occupy the basement in any favorable comparisons. Now it’s Louisiana, which is 45 or 46 in almost all categories. But let’s get to us. Texas is 41in education. I lay the blame on several factors: We don’t spend enough on our schools, students and teachers. Indeed, the Legislature even now is figuring out how to reduce our education budget. Meanwhile, we spend tens of millions of dollars on football stadiums. Texas is attempting to educate up to 86,000 Dreamers from south of the border, most of whom don’t speak English. They will drag down any SAT scores. The State Board of Education is a miserable example of inmates running the asylum. No, global warming is not a hoax. Houston was not originally named Hughes Town in honor of native son Howard. And let’s stop debating whether Jesus was a Christian.

Next comes health care. We get a 30. Why so low? Because our state officials knowingly and willingly turn their collective backs on Medicare programs, thus sending billions of our tax dollars to other states to treat their citizens. Does this make sense? No wonder Texas has the highest number of unvaccinated children in America and is last in children with health insurance, and no wonder Houston has the largest medical center on Earth. We have the most sick people.

Crime and corrections. Texas has long had a lock ‘em up philosophy on crime, which accounts for the 172,000 Texans we hold behind bars, by far the most of any state. And in most years we lead the nation in executions. So in the crime and corrections category we rank 31 among the states. Not much more to say about this comparison. Moving on, we come to infrastructure. A miserable Number 40. To be sure, we have more roads, more railroad miles and quite probably more potholes and rickety bridges than any other state. But the state also has more newcomers than the other 49, who use a growing amount of our infrastructure. We can’t keep up, and we obviously don’t plan to. Opportunity: New Mexico calls itself “the land of opportunity,” but ranks 46 in this study. New Hampshire is first. Thank God for Mississippi, which is last. Texas is a lowly 45 in opportunity. That surprises me because hordes of people come here from both south and north seeking jobs, better pay and far better Tex-Mex than their homelands offer.

This also surprising because of our next category: Economy. We are up there in the No. 6 slot. (Colorado is first.) Former governor and current Energy Secretary Rick Perry ran for President twice on his “Texas miracle” platform, touting our booming economy and, piggybacking it on our great opportunities. It would seem that these last two categories, opportunities and the economy, would be about the same. Now we get down to the nitty-gritty: the category that is responsible for most of the other rankings: state government. According this first-ever survey by USNWR, the state with the best government is – roll of drums – Indiana! Huh? Yes, they have the Indianapolis 500 (I think they’re all guilty) and former Indiana Gov. Mike Pence is now the vice-president, president of the Senate and world-wide Explainer & Apologizer in Chief. But Indiana? Last, with the worst government, is New Jersey. Texas comes in at No. 11. Really, considering how low we are in everything from health care to cons to infrastructure, we should be lower.

Which is the best all-around state? The envelope, please. The winner is “La La Land.” No, actually it’s Massachusetts. The Bay State finished first in education (Yeah, but can Harvard play decent football?), second in health care and never placed lower than 16 in any category. Texas, our beloved Texas, all hail the 38th best state. We know we’re No. 1, but when we rank lower than Georgia, South Dakota and Idaho, it’s time to re-evaluate our state’s government. We could be defensive and note that U.S. News was the lowest-ranking news magazine in the U.S., after Time and Newsweek before it went defunct. Now it is only on-line and publishes special issues like its rankings. But being defensive would overlook the fact that Texas is poorly governed. As you read these very words, our legislators are meeting in Austin deciding who to tax, how much, and where to spend it. They are empowered to support good and forward-looking projects. But led by the Official State Demagogue, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, our lawmakers are debating school bathrooms. Good ol’ Patrick. Hours after 49 people were massacred and 53 wounded in a gay bar in Orlando, Patrick tweeted a Bible verse: “Do not be deceived: God cannot be mocked. A man reaps what he sows.” And he asked parents if they wanted their 10th grader showering with students of the opposite sex. We’re lucky we rank at all.

 

Ashby ranks at ashby2@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

Champion Wine Garden at Houston Rodeo

March 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Entertainment, Events

Opening a sparkling wine correctly is important. Hold the cork. Shift the bottle. It should sigh. Open and enjoy.

Tips like this and so much more are available when you visit the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Champion Wine Garden.

 

Live music, a festive

atmosphere and award winning wines are on tap at this outdoor venue located between the carnival midway and NRG.

Wine submission stats:

2850 wine entries

20 countries

235 Texas wines

 

The double blind judging took place in November.

Wines to watch:

Grand champion is from Spain.

2010 Arinzano $120.

 

2014 Texas Chardonnay Fall Creek $94

Notorious Mt. Veeder Malbec

Nice Winery $120.

http://www.rodeohouston.com/Visit-the-Show/Attractions-Activities/Wine-Garden

 

 

 

Caribbean Karisma

March 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Travel Blog

By Bianca Vertil

Located in the Mexican jungle in Riviera Maya, Cancun, lies a series of Karisma Hotels & Resorts. Karisma Hotels & Resorts, an award-winning luxury hotel collection, owns and manages properties in Latin America, the Caribbean and Europe. Karisma is comprised of an impressive selection including El Dorado Spa Resorts & Hotels, Generations Resorts, Azul Hotels & Villas, and Allure Hotels. Karisma properties have been honored with the industry’s top accolades and have received worldwide recognition for its creative approach to hospitality management and product innovations.

 

El Dorado Spa Resorts & Hotels is a premier, adults-only property located in the jungles of Riviera Maya, Mexico. Upon your arrival, you are welcomed with a champagne toast and introduced to your personal concierge. There is a sense of calm, casual luxury at the 450 room resort. Whether you choose to stay in a swim-up suite or private beachfront villa, all guests have all-suite accommodations, pool and beach butler service, hammock amenities, and 24-hour room service. El Dorado received AAA’s “Four Diamond Award” for its outstanding environmentally sustainable services.

There are many fun activities couples are encouraged to take full advantage of during their stay ranging from snorkeling in the sea, zip-lining through the jungle, horseback riding, and more. Some complimentary services include a tequila tasting, morning yoga, bike tour, Spanish class, cooking class, shuttle, and more. The resort also has evening entertainment every day located at Guacamayas Bar. At 6 p.m. a new movie is played, live music at 8:30 p.m., some sort of entertainment performance (for example, a circus show, fire performance, karaoke, etc.) at 10 p.m., then dancing and a DJ until 2 a.m. There is something for everyone to enjoy at El Dorado.

 

Say “I Do” by the Sea

Create memorable moments with El Dorado, and plan your private events at the resort. Whether you are newly engaged, planning a honeymoon, celebrating your anniversary, or just need a romantic getaway, Karisma will create the most memorable details to make your event special. Gourmet Inclusive Wedding Events by Karisma Hotels & Resorts strives to help you enjoy a truly special destination wedding. There is an assortment of signature wedding packages as well as venues to choose from. Whether it is a beachfront chapel, private beach, pier gazebo, or beautiful sky location, Karisma’s signature wedding designers and staff will diligently take care of every aspect of event coordination. Chapels typically hold 40-50 people, gazebos, seat around 20-30 people, and the most popular choice, the sky venues, hold up to 120 people. If any of your guests need to bring their children along, nanny services are offered at Little Eko, a kids center, at the neighboring Generations Resort location. Although walking distance, there are 24-hour shuttles running through the resorts.

 

Celebrate Your Big Day in Luxury

Pamper yourself at the Mayan inspired Naay Spa. You can choose to receive a relaxing spa treatment on the beach, inside the comfortable Naay Spa, alone, or with a loved one. Guests who are celebrating a special event during their stay are offered the complimentary Memorable Moments Spa Package. There are six bridal suites located in the spa building. The third floor can be turned into a private party for brides. At these private parties, 10-15 people are welcome to get wedding ready at $25 per person. There is also a groom room, where men are welcome to get ready for the big day. To make this spa truly unique, guests are invited to experience Temazcal, a traditional Mayan experience performed by a shaman.

 

Eat and Drink in Style

El Dorado has partnered with Jackson Family Wines to create The Jackson Family Wines Culinary Series by Karisma. The exclusive event is carefully catered to guests that prefer quality over quantity and a must for wine-lovers and connoisseurs. At a cost of $300, guests are enticed with a week of hands-on epicurean experiences, vertical tastings, educational classes with sommeliers and winemakers, cooking courses, special pairings, elaborate meals and an exclusive Guest Chef and Winemaster’s Dinner. A la cart rates for wines and ad hoc wine and culinary experiences start at $35. The program which takes place the first week of each month, spotlights distinguished chefs, restauranteurs, winemakers and sommeliers. The 2016 lineup includes culinary visionaries such as Mark Stark of Stark Restaurants and Food & Wine Best New Chef Sue Zemanick from New Orleans’ Gautreau’s Restaurant as well as an impressive roster of other prominent chefs.

There is a wide variety of restaurants at El Dorado Resorts. Whether you are in the mood for Italian, Mediterranean, Caribbean, Asian, Mexican, or American food, there is an inclusive, gourmet restaurant to satisfy your craving. If you want to start off the day with a well-balanced breakfast, you can visit Cocotal, La Isla, Jojo’s, Spot, or Sante Fe Grill. Lunch is served at Jojo’s, Kampai, La Isla, and Rincon Mexicano. Finally, set the mood with a romantic dinner preapared at D’Italia Villas, D’Italia Casitas, Cocotal, La Isla, Kampai, Jojo’s Rincon Mexicano, Sante Fe, and Fuentes. There is an extensive room service menu, and gourmet corner restaurants (La Cabana Pizzeria, Health Bar, Bar 31 (Las Olas), and Kick) that are conveniently accessible as well. Each restaurant includes a Wine Spectator award-winning wine list, sommelier, and premium liquor.

A unique dining experience is provided at these resorts; while there are no buffets, the restaurants display an open, farm-to-table, food concept. Guests can see how food is prepared, giving them an experience with amazing details. Be sure to stop by Fuentes culinary theatre to watch a chef showcase while enjoying your meal. The food served at the resorts come from Karisma’s own green house. Tours of the state-of-the-art, hydroponic greenhouse are a complimentary service.

 

Courtesy photo

 

Grin and Bear It

March 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

WACO – “A vodka, straight, please,” I say. The bartender springs into action. This is most unusual because I am on the campus of Baylor University, the nation’s largest Baptist school, noted for no booze, no smoking and – until recently — no dancing. Oh, and known for an on-going scandal about gang rapes and football players. This is the new (2014) football stadium, originally named Baylor Stadium but changed to Drayton McLane Stadium after a huge gift from the alumni who sold the Houston Astros for $680 million. Also, and this I didn’t know, the City of Waco kicked in $30 million. Wonder if College Station or Austin did the same for their universities?

For the money, Baylor has built what may be the best football stadium in America. This place is spiffy enough that there is a fancy social event being held here, at the same time a wedding rehearsal dinner is underway on another level. Maybe there is hope for the Astrodome. Ah, but what about liquor? A bartender explains that only suite renters can have booze. The big donors call in their order a week or two before the game, the booze is taken to the suite and locked up until kickoff. No other alcohol is allowed in, and to think that UT is now selling beer at sporting events. Some may call this “hypocrisy.” I call it “doing business.”

While we’re here, let’s take a look at Texas’ oldest university, which has one of the Lone Star State’s more interesting collegiate stories. Willie Nelson went here for one year, majoring in animal science and joining Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, then dropped out to become a musician and was never heard from again. Interesting note: a Baylor alumni publication put Willie on its cover, but the Baptist elders did not approve of someone who had been married three times and busted for pot four times. I believe the magazine was killed. Other students included Govs. Ann Richards, Price Daniel and Mark White (more Texas governors are from Baylor than any other school). Also, Sul Ross, Sam Houston’s son, Temple Lea Houston (Sam gave the first $5,000 to the school) and my father. I couldn’t afford $5,000 so I donated Dad’s 1926 baseball letter sweater and team photo to the school which was putting in an athletic museum. Later I inquired about the sweater and photo. They couldn’t find them.

Baylor, which opened in 1845 in the long-forgotten town of Independence, is not only the oldest continuously-operating university in Texas but one of the first higher educational institutions west of the Mississippi River. When the railroad bypassed Independence, Baylor moved to that wild town of Waco. The school was named for one of its founders, Robert E.B. Baylor, who helped write the state constitution and favored baring clergy from holding public office. It is a private school in the Big XII, so no legislative cash. Baylor’s motto, appearing on its seal, is Pro Ecclesia, Pro Texana (For Church, for Texas) although Bondus Freedonia (Out on Bail) might fit better. The 1,000-acre campus sits on the banks of the Brazos River. UT-Austin sits on the banks of Waller Creek. UH-Downtown overlooks Buffalo Bayou. Its student body numbers about 16,700. Its colors are not black-and-white stripes nor jump-suit orange, but green and gold. Their song is “That Good Ol’ Baylor Line,” to the tune of “In the Good Old Summertime.” My theory is the Bears noticed at a football game with the Longhorns, the Teasips were singing “I’ve Been Working on the Railroad.” That inspired Baylor to adopt “Summer Time.” Actually, according to sources I have copied, in 1906, a student penned humorous words to the tune of “In the Good Old Summer Time” and they became generally accepted among the student body as the school’s fight song. However, in 1931 the wife of a Baylor music professor felt the words “were neither dignified enough nor representative of the total university,” so she wrote new lyrics, which were soon adopted as the official school song.

Baylor has played Texas A&M in football 108 times, beginning in 1899. No more. However, those games produced one of the saddest stories in college football. According to my thorough research, Wikipedia, the 1926 game was in played in Waco and was Baylor’s homecoming. During halftime Baylor homecoming floats paraded around the field. When a car pulling a flatbed trailer with several female Baylor students neared the Texas A&M Corps of Cadets’ section, a cadet raced towards the car and grabbed the steering wheel. The motion caused Louise Normand to fall off the truck, injuring her and inciting a large riot. Students began using metal folding chairs and planks of wood that had been used as yard markers for weapons. Texas A&M cadet Lt. Charles Sessums was hit in the head and, although he initially appeared to recover, he died following the game. The two school presidents agreed to temporarily suspend athletic relations between the schools. They did not compete against each other in any athletic event for the next four years. Baylor and Texas A&M would not meet in football again until 1931.

For years, the Baylor football team was the doormat of the Southwest Conference. The Bears didn’t win a Southwest Conference championship for 50 years (1924-1974). That was a longer time span than between Baylor’s 1924 championship and Custer’s Last Stand. Then there is the tale of yet another apparent at-home Bear defeat. They were down three touchdowns in the fourth quarter, and the Baylor fans started leaving. Then the Bears scored, and again, and once more. Departing fans listening to the game on their car radio did a U-turn to go back to the stadium, but met nose-to-nose with later leavers. There was a gigantic traffic snarl. I don’t know who won. Anyway, the Bears will get out of their current mess. Don’t leave the game early, and I’ll drink to that.

 

Ashby is toasting at ashby2@comcast.net