Labor Day Weekend 2014

August 27, 2014 by  
Filed under Holiday

Wondering what to do this Labor Day weekend? Here are a few suggestions we know you’ll love!

Houston Restaurant Weeks 2014

hrw_logo_2014

Choose from more than 170 Houston restaurants offering special lunches, dinners and brunches throughout all of August as part of Houston Restaurant Weeks 2014. Each restaurant will offer special two- to four-course menus for $20 to $45 per person. The exact menu and price varies by restaurant. For every meal sold, a portion of the proceeds will go to benefit the Houston Food Bank, and in turn also support the Brazos Valley Food Bank, the Galveston County Food Bank and the Montgomery County Food Bank. You must make your reservation for Houston Restaurant Weeks 2014 in advance, and specify that you are selecting that option. If you use OpenTable.com to make your reservation, include ‘Request HRW Menu’ in the comments field. 

Website: www.houstonrestaurantweeks.com
Menus: Click Here to View Full Menus

 

Godspell at Miller Outdoor Theatre

godspell

Dates: Thursday, August 28 and Friday, August 29, 2014
Time: 8pm both nights
Location: Miller Outdoor Theatre, 6000 Herman Park Dr. Houston, TX 77030
Admission: Free

One of the biggest Broadway and off-Broadway successes of all time, Godspell is an electrifying, soulful folk-rock recreation of the Gospel of St. Matthew. The catchy and unforgettable score by Stephen Schwartz includes songs such as such as “Day by Day,” “Prepare Ye the Way,” and “Light of the World,” combined with a variety of storytelling techniques, creates an undeniably powerful musical that continues to captivate audiences of all ages from around the world.

Brewmasters 5th Annual Craft Beer Festival

brew 2

The Amazing Houston Comic Con

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Amazing Houston Comic Con debuts August 29-30-31 at the George R Brown Convention Center, with the best and brightest in comic book and pop entertainment. Meet your favorite creators and celebrities at this 3-day event, filled with a giant exhibitors hall, an international artist alley, video game arena, hundreds of people in costume and more. There is something for everyone at the Amazing Houston Comic Con, from After Hours parties to family fun on Sunday Kid’s Day!

When: August 29-31
FRI 8/29: 3pm-8pm
SAT 8/30: 10am-7pm
SUN 8/31: 10am-6pm
Where: George R. Brown Convention Center
1001 Avenida de las Americas, Houston, TX 77010
Get Tickets Here
Exhibitor Info Here

Things to do with the Kiddos from BigKidSmallCity

Thursday, August 28, 2014:
Free Museum Entry
Children’s Museum of Houston FREE Thursday 5:00-8:00pm
The Health Museum FREE Thursday 2:00-5:00pm
The John C. Freeman Weather Museum FREE Thursday 12:00-4:00pm
Houston Museum of Natural Science FREE Thursdays 3:00-6:00pm
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston FREE Thursdays 10:00-9:00pm
Summer Night Salsa – 6:30-7:30pm – Discovery Green
Godspell – 8:00pm – Miller Outdoor Theatre

Friday, August 29, 2014:
Godspell – 8:00pm – Miller Outdoor Theatre 

Saturday, August 30, 2014:
Young Writers Workshop – 10:30am – Discovery Green 
Fandango: A Night in Madrid – 8:00pm – Miller Outdoor Theatre

Sunday, August 31, 2014:
Family Zone 
– 1:00-4:00pm Museum of Fine Arts
Bollywood Blast: The Bollywood Bandwagon – 8:00pm – Miller Outdoor Theatre

Monday, September 1, 2014:
Go HERE for free things to do any day of the week!

Sketching in the Galleries – 1:00-4:00pm – Museum of Fine Arts

Tuesday, September 2, 2014:
Toddler Tuesday: Thomas the Train – 10:30am – Discovery Green
Free Entry to the Zoo – 2:00-Closing – Houston Zoo

Wednesday, September 3, 2014:
Mommy Mingle 
– 10:00-12:00pm – Children’s Museum of Houston
Nature Story Time – 4:00pm – Nature Discovery Center

Caribbean International Fest at Amity Park Alief

 The Caribbean Chamber of Commerce of Texas launches its first ever all-day festival with a diverse array of musical acts and foods from the Caribbean tropics and across Houston. $5; free for kids 10 and under. 10am to 9pm.

caribbean

3rd Annual Pearland Wine & Food Festival

Wine Festival

Dionisio Winery presents its 3rd Annual Wine & Food Festival from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday, August 30 at 4070 Wells Drive in Pearland. Dionisio Winery owner and Pearland resident, Jimmy Aranda, relocated the event to Pearland in 2014.  Wineries featured include Los Pinos Ranch Vineyards, Red 55 Winery, Haak Vineyards & Winery and Maydee Country Wines. In addition to a great selection of wines, visitors will find food vendors, retailers and music by Thermal Fusion. For more information or tickets, email dionisiowinery@gmail.com or call 713.906.2499.

Labor Day Sunday at Pub Fiction

Click Here for Details

pub

Enjoy breakfast to 2pm and all day drink specials. DJ Bizonee takes to the turntables at 10pm. 10:30am to 2am.

Celtic Gardens Labor Day Sunday

Click Here for Details
Party with $10 mimosa carafes, $5 sangrias, $4 Guiinness and Saint Arnold’s drafts. Music from DJ Kyle Berg at 3pm and Tony Styles at $10. 11am to 2pm.

celtic

The Ginger Man’s Backyard Labor Day Party

Enjoy an afternoon of live music and specials on pints from Rahr and Sons. 1pm to 2am.
The Ginger Man Website

ginger

Last Weekend to Enjoy Houston’s Public Pools!

Pool

Cool down in one of Houston’s Public Pools. Check out our blog for a list of pools!

Catch an Astros Game!

astros

Houston Astros vs Texas Rangers
Where: Minute Maid Park
501 Crawford Street
Houston, Texas, 77002
When: Friday, August 29
Time: 7:10 pm
Phone: 713-259-8000

Houston Astros vs Texas Rangers
Where: Minute Maid Park
501 Crawford Street
Houston, Texas, 77002
When: Saturday, August 30
Time: 6:10 pm
Phone: 713-259-8000

Houston Astros vs Texas Rangers
Where: Minute Maid Park
501 Crawford Street
Houston, Texas, 77002
When:  Sunday, August 31
Time: 1:10 pm
Phone: 713-259-8000

Kids First Saturday at The Breakfast Klub

August 26, 2014 by  
Filed under Events, Kid's Corner

Kids Corner

When:  July 05, 2014 (Recurring monthly on the 1st Saturday)
Location: The Breakfast Klub
Address: 3711 Travis St.,  Houston, TX 77002
Admission:  Free!!!
They have a moonwalk so the kids can bounce around, a face painter, arts & krafts, and from time-to-time live entertainment to keep your little ones entertained for hours.

First Saturday Art Crawl

August 26, 2014 by  
Filed under Bars & Nightlife, Entertainment, Events

art crawl

Location: Houston Socialites Club
Phone:  832-409-3151
Times: 4:00PM – 7:00PM
Website: www.houstonsocialites.com


On the first Saturday each month, join HSC for a fun, social art crawl around Houston, followed by dinner/drinks. Each month will feature a different art cluster/neighborhood, and includes these old favorites: Gallery Row, Montrose, Rice, Upper Kirby, Heights, to name a few. To find out details of our next First Saturday Art Crawl, contact Dannie@houstonsocialites.com

First Saturday Arts Market

August 26, 2014 by  
Filed under Entertainment, Events

fist saturday
When:  From: May 03, 2014 – May 02, 2015 (Recurring monthly on the 1st Saturday)
Where: 548 W. 19th Street, Houston, TX 77008
Website: 
www.firstsaturdayartsmarket.com

First Saturday Arts Market is a monthly outdoor fine arts event featuring the works of dozens of visual artists. Located in the Historic Houston Heights by Gen’s Antiques at 548 W. 19th St. at Lawrence St., the market showcases paintings, sculpture, photography, jewelry and handcrafted items. Bring the entire family and come enjoy the great outdoors, live music and delicious fare from some of the area’s best gourmet food trucks,

Amazing Houston Comic Con – August 29-31

August 26, 2014 by  
Filed under Events

logo

 

Amazing Houston Comic Con debuts August 29-30-31 at the George R Brown Convention Center, with the best and brightest in comic book and pop entertainment. Meet your favorite creators and celebrities at this 3-day event, filled with a giant exhibitors hall, an international artist alley, video game arena, hundreds of people in costume and more. There is something for everyone at the Amazing Houston Comic Con, from After Hours parties to family fun on Sunday Kid’s Day!

When: August 29-31
FRI 8/29: 3pm-8pm
SAT 8/30: 10am-7pm
SUN 8/31: 10am-6pm
Where: George R. Brown Convention Center
1001 Avenida de las Americas, Houston, TX 77010
Get Tickets Here
Exhibitor Info Here

NOT SAM’S CLUB

August 25, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

 

THE MAILBOX – Here is more junk mail plus the usual ransom notices, threatening letters from debt collectors and former friends – I didn’t actually know my dog was rabid. What’s this? A letter from my Congressman, how nice, I guess, because it reminds me of a recent news article about Congress, specifically about the expenses of our U.S. senators. On a list of all 100 senators compiled by the Washington Post and listed by amount of office expense, Texas Sens. Ted Cruz and John Cornyn take spots four and five, respectively, as most expensive.

You read right. Our own two U.S. senators from Texas are among the biggest spenders of taxpayers’ dollars – on themselves and their helpers. Cruz’s office spent $3.8 million from April 2013 through March 2014 on salaries, office equipment and travel to and from the state. Cornyn was close — his Senate office spent more than $3.7 million in the same 12-month period. And get this: Cornyn’s minority whip leadership office gave out more than $800,000 in salaries. How much are whips? Contrast these dollars with the average Senate office total: about $2.5 million. Only Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., and Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., spent more. OK, we can expect Feinstein and Boxer to top the list. Those liberals never saw a tax dollar they couldn’t spend. But Marco Rubio, that darling of conservatives, that tea party pet, sworn to cut expenses? And then come our own spendthrifts.

We sent them to Washington to cut taxes (ours especially), shrink the size of government (but not our post office, VA hospital or our National Guard paychecks) and cut government expenses (but not our contract with the CIA for putty noses), reduce fraud and waste. They are Watchdogs of the Treasury. Every speech they give, every press release – which we pay for – bemoans the feds’ profligate ways, and they are fighting for us! So let’s peer into this a bit more. The news stories say many of the expenses their offices incurred came from travel to and from Texas for both senators and their staffers. Do they fly first class or rent Air Force One?

In that one-year period Cruz and his staff made 593 trips from Washington to the state. Cornyn and his staff made 344. Costs varied, ranging from as little as $100 to more than $6,000 for a trip Cornyn made through eight Texas cities in March. Here’s an eye-opener: Cruz spent around $18,000 on charter flights in Texas. Not all states have such wild spenders: 76 senators took commercial flights. Here’s another interesting item: “Just over a month before the federal government shut down in October, Sen. Ted Cruz’s staff of 51 people attended a retreat in Austin. The hotel expenses, posted on Nov. 18, totaled $11,610 and were paid to the Intercontinental Stephen F. Austin Hotel.”

Two points jump off the ledger: 51 staffers? The junior senator from Texas has that army? Several must only book planes and hotels. And they stayed, ate and drank, at one of the ritziest pads in Austin. A spokeswoman said the hotel offered a federal rate and was the best option for the staff’s budget and needs. Fort Hood offers federal rates, so does Lackland. I suggest they bunk at one of those warehouses used to stick displaced Central American kids. But those concrete barns don’t have bars — except on the windows. Second point: Ted Cruz is the junior – repeat, junior – senator from Texas, having been in office one year and eight months, low down in the senate’s pecking order. Just wait till he is minority whip, then wait till he’s majority whip. There goes our next submarine

We must contrast these forms of transportation with another Texas Congressman: Speaker of the U.S. House Sam Rayburn, who served in Congress 48 years – 17 as speaker, almost twice as long as second-place Tip O’Neill. Back in Mister Sam’s days, railroad companies would give free tickets to members of Congress. Sam never took the tickets and usually rode coach. His mother once wrote him, “We often wish for you to be with us, but we would rather wait a little longer than for you to accept free passes.” As speaker, Rayburn had a staff of six.

Such frugality leads directly to this letter from my U.S. representative. He writes that he is pursuing “rigorous fiscal discipline,” and “my job is to say ‘no’ to more federal spending, unless it is for law enforcement, national defense, scientific research, or space exploration.” That’s fine with most of us, as long as we don’t want to drive on the Interstate highways, let our children consume uninspected food and fly on planes with no air controllers down below to make sure we don’t collide with Cruz’s missile. But the Congressman may have one problem. No Census Bureau means no census, which is what he and others twist to gerrymander Texas so they can keep their jobs. He also wants to withhold funds from the Dept. of Homeland Security until it can prove “our immigration laws are fully and equally enforced.” Doesn’t he understand the law barring the immediate deportation of those children IS being enforced – a law enacted when he was in Congress and signed by President George W. Bush? That IS the law.

Down at the bottom of this blatant campaign literature is type so small you need the Hubble telescope to read it: “This mailing was prepared, published and mailed at taxpayer expense. It is provided as a service to constituents.” Sam Rayburn never mailed out one news letterer in his 48 years in office. A last observation: For the first time in its history, Congress has a majority of millionaires – a few more Democrats than Republicans. Some of you exhausted taxpayers may observe that all of these doings by Texas’ current Congressmen are deep-fried hypocrisy, and you demand a change. Change can be made. It’s called “voting.” Like I said, here’s more junk mail.

Ashby pays at ashby2@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

Turkish Airlines Expands Business Class Seating

August 25, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Travel Blog

Turkish Airlines, voted Europe’s Best Airline for the fourth year in a row, announced the expansion of its Business Class seating capacity from 28 to 49 seats, providing more Houstonians access to Turkish Airlines’ unparalleled in-flight service and award-winning cuisine. The expansion also coincides with the upgrade to Boeing 777 planes from Houston, which features free Wi-Fi for Business Class passengers.

Houston, one of Turkish Airlines’ six U.S. gateways, continues to thrive in the highly competitive travel industry. One of the world’s fastest growing airlines, Turkish Airlines currently flies to 260 destinations in 108 countries, making it number one in terms of countries an airline flies to. Moreover, in the first five months of 2014, Turkish Airlines experienced an 18 percent increase in passenger numbers from 18.1 million to 21.3 million compared with the same period last year. At the helm of this gateway is Adem Ekmekci, General Manager, Turkish Airlines, Houston.

Houston Business Class travelers will also be delighted to know that the airline recently revamped its Turkish Corporate Club Premium (TCCP) Program, which provides companies, organizations and business travelers a convenient and unique travel experience with countless advantages, including discounted flights, rebooking/rerouting flexibility, and exclusive baggage allowances. The program is designed to adapt to and exceed every company’s distinct needs when it comes to traveling.

Turkish Airlines is also offering the opportunity to explore Istanbul starting at $699* this fall! This beautiful Turkish city was named the number one destination worldwide in TripAdvisor’s 2014 Travelers’ Choice Awards. The airline is offering this special roundtrip flight deal from Houston to Istanbul with a purchasing period until September 15, and a travel period between October 12 and December 12, 2014.

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11th Annual Gulf Coast International Dragon Boat Regatta – Brooks Lake @ Fluor, Sugar Land October 18-19, 2014

August 20, 2014 by  
Filed under Events

regatta 2013
What performances will you see at the 11th Annual Gulf Coast International Dragon Boat Regatta? There is always a lot for the whole family to enjoy both in and out of the water at the Gulf Coast International Dragon Boat Regatta held in Sugar Land, Texas. This event culminates the last race of dragon boat season. Dragon boat racing is the ultimate team-building activity for 25 team members, and many companies as well as community groups come together to race against other teams for their chance at the gold. Our event has come to be known as one of the largest multicultural and team-building activities in Fort Bend bringing with over 5,000 visitors who want to see the action both on and off the water.

Teams with a crew of 25 including the drummer paddling their boats with a small dragon head and a fiery tail to the finish will be exciting to see. Teams participating in the regatta give their all when paddling a boat that measures 40 feet in length, 4 feet in width and weighing 500 pounds. Dragon boat racing not only builds muscles and strength, it builds harmonious relationships. This is a great team building event for people ages 15 and 60 and older.

Our event has come to be known as one of the largest multicultural and team-building activities in Fort Bend County- bringing over 5,000 visitors. While there is a lot of excitement about the activities in the water, there is plenty of action on land. We have a sample of Asian cuisine, colorful arts and crafts, and cultural performance which include Chinese lion dancing, martial arts demonstrations, belly dancing, and many other performances focusing on Asian traditions. This event is a free, family event will. You don’t want to miss it!

EVENT DETAILS:

October 18-19, 2014

11th Annual Gulf Coast International Dragon Boat Regatta

8:30 AM – 4:00 PM

Brooks Lake at Fluor Campus in Sugar Land, Texas (1 Flour Daniel Drive, Sugar Land, TX 77478)

Free Admission to the public

If you are interested in joining us this year or would like more information on sponsorship, vendors, committee and volunteer opportunities, please contact Eve Marie Ruhlman, the Executive Director at director@texasdragonboat.com or visit www.texasdragonboat.com

Susan G. Komen® Houston Announces Annual Race for the Cure®

August 20, 2014 by  
Filed under Events

Susan G. Komen® Houston Announces Annual Race for the Cure®
City’s Largest Footrace Returns to Downtown Houston

Susan G. Komen® Houston  has officially kicked off registration and is gearing up for its 24th annual Susan G. Komen Houston Race for the Cure®. On October 4, 2014, Downtown Houston will welcome the city’s largest footrace and a wave of pink runners, all joining together to raise funds for lifesaving services and to help bring an end to breast cancer, forever.
 
Komen Houston Race for the Cure® is Komen Houston’s largest annual fundraiser, and the money raised through this event helps fund programs in the seven-county area it serves in and around Houston to provide breast cancer education, screening, treatment and support services for men and women who may not be able to afford them.
 
75% of the funds raised stay right here in Houston to support education programs, mammograms, patient navigation, treatment and support groups provided by the local health organizations it funds, and 25% of the funds go to vital breast cancer research on a national level, but with a large, state-of-the-art Medical Center in the heart of the city, many of those research grants end up coming back to Houston. Race participation and involvement is crucial in order to reduce the number of deaths due to breast cancer.
 
Runners and walkers, alike, can sign up to participate in the Komen Houston Race for the Cure® by joining an existing team, forming a new team, or by registering on their own. Komen Houston encourages Houstonians to join a team and donate or fundraise $100 this year. Its new #Raceto100 campaign challenges Houstonians to go beyond simply registering, and to raise or donate $100 this year. $100 can provide several patients with the first steps towards their treatment, such as a consultation visit and clinical breast exam, and is a reachable goal for participants.
 
“The annual Komen Houston Race for the Cure is a crucial fundraising and awareness event for the organization as a whole,” says Adriana M. Higgins, Executive Director of Komen Houston. “Thanks to the generous and dedicated runners and supporters throughout the city, Komen Houston is able to provide grants to area organizations and service providers that are making incredible strides to put an end to breast cancer for thousands of men and women.”
 
Houston native, Kristen Barley, is a breast cancer survivor and passionate advocate of breast cancer awareness and early screening. Kristen has joined Komen Houston as this year’s Race Chair, sponsored for the 10th year by Marathon Oil Corporation.
 
The 2014 Komen Houston Race for the Cure® route is a USATF 5K course with running and walking events, including a 5K timed competitive run, 5K timed non-competitive run and a 5K walk and family walk. Participants who are unable to attend the physical Race are welcome to fundraise and participate through Sleep in for the Cure®.
 
For more information regarding Komen Houston, Race for the Cure® or any of its other events, please contact Allison Huseman at 713-225-0880  or allison@integrateagency.com .

Brewmasters 5th Annual Craft Beer Festival – August 29-31st

August 19, 2014 by  
Filed under Bars & Nightlife, Events, Foodie Events

 

 

 

brew 2

3rd Annual Wine and Food Festival Presented By Dionisio Winery

August 19, 2014 by  
Filed under Events, Foodie Events

Wine Festival

 Date: August 30, 2014
Times: 12:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Location:  Billy’s Hall  4070 Wells Drive, Pearland TX 77584

In a Nutshell:
Local businesses join 5 local wineries for an outdoor festival full of music, award-winning fruit wine, and delicious food

Wineries:
Dionisio Winery – Downtown Houston,TX
Haak Vineyards & Winery- Santa Fe,TX
Los Pinos Ranch Vineyards – Pittsburg, TX
Red 55 Winery – Lindale, TX
Maydelle Country Wines – Rusk, TX

Limited Time Offer Get Tickets Here:
https://www.groupon.com/deals/dionisio-winery]

OR
www.livingsocial.com/events/cities/7-houston/1111987-admission-to-the-3rd-annual-dionisio-wine-festival?index=1]
OR
https://local.amazon.com/houston/B00K1LM7JA]

For Additional Information for being a Sponsor or Vendor please contact us at:
dionisiowinery@gmail.com

BORDERING ON WEIRD

August 18, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

 

My fellow Patriots,

This is an invitation to a secret meeting of the Texas Militia & Non-Mensas. Maybe you saw our ad in the papers and on TV. We are here to guard the Rio Grande River because all kinds of terrorists are sneaking across our border, like that guy Al Kida, and Obama Ben Franklin. Now we have an invasion of so-called “children,” but some are actually terrorists disguised as “children” while some are made up to be donkeys, clay pots and bales of marijuana bound for Colorado. Other invaders are calling themselves “women,” and this is a bit tricky for us to deal with because most of us haven’t been around a woman for years, even though we’ve let them vote and drive sometimes. Texas is no longer a red state or a blue state. It’s a brown state. We’ve got to stop them.

The new twist in these “children” and “women” immigrants is that they aren’t from Mexico but from Central American countries like Guacamole, El Stevedore and Horrendous, because a law lets anyone in who’s from a country that is not contagious to the U.S. That commie Kenyan Barracks Obama refuses to do anything to stop the flow because he claims John Boehner won’t let him. Why doesn’t Obama sign a good immigration bill like our President George W. Bush? No, wait. I’m being told that it was Bush’s bill that led to the border mess. Let me get back to you on this, but I’m sure that somehow it is Obama’s fault.

Anyway, we need to stop this flow by putting more boots on the ground. We are told that these children actually want to be found and sent to a detention center where they finally get some food, a bed and a one-way ticket to their uncle in Amarillo. This doesn’t make any sense. If that were really the case, the more Border Guards with more boots on the ground, the easier for the kids to find them. Maybe we’ve got this all wrong. Maybe we use just one Border Patrol agent, put him in a high-rise office in El Paso, with an unlisted phone number, and those illegal kids will never find him.

Fortunately, since that African illegal immigrant Obama has done nothing, we have Governor for Life Rick Perry. He has ordered the entire Texas National Guard to go to the border and do something. According to a press release by his non-campaign presidential campaign manager, the guardsmen will be more boots on the ground, which is why Perry did not also call up the Texas Air National Guard. We need boots, not jets. The National Guardsmen cannot arrest anyone, something about that pesky U.S. Constitution, but they can bring coffee to the patrolmen, open mail, answer the phone and pose for photographs looking tough. Perry says funds for this program, about $17 million a month, will come from the money he was going to allot to Planned Parenthood.

Here are a few things to do: Always keep your gun loaded, except when firing. Or maybe it’s the other way around. One or the other. Capt. Buck Shot forgot his 0-99 Migrant Mower was fully loaded when he passed out at a Laredo bar and fell to the floor. We shall miss him. If you want to use pistols, remember state law requires you keep them concealed, but you can do as we members of the Shoot First Club did and walk around with your rifle in the open and at the ready, and maybe go into eateries. Sure stirred them up at that Chuck E Cheese birthday party the other day. Bazookas, 105 howitzers and napalm may be used in some cases, but you didn’t hear that from me. Machineguns are allowed, but bayonets are frowned on.

 

Always be well-kamoflaged. Blend in with your surroundings. For some of you working better neighborhoods, this means getting a haircut, taking a bath and shaving. For those stationed in the countryside, you can get a cactus suit at Academy complete with three-inch thorns. Don’t make the mistake Corporal Charlie J. made and put it on inside out. We shall miss him, too. Another good kamoflage is the tumbleweed. In that case, forget about the haircut. This brings us to infiltrators. Word is that the FBI is sending its agents to join our band. If you spot someone who uses polysyllable words – is polysyllable a word? – uses a handkerchief or seat belts and no tattoos, they don’t pass the smell test, if you get my drift. Many of you have prior experience facing down those feds in the Nevada desert when they tried to seize that rancher’s cows just because he owed more than a million bucks in grazing fees, penalties and back taxes. The feds need to keep their hands off us and our Social Security checks, military pensions, Medicare, Medicaid and air traffic controllers.

Our lieutenant governor-in-waiting, Dan Patrick, has warned about these newcomers carrying typhoid, sidewalk syndrome, bated breath and other insecticides, so when actually handling them, like if they faint from hunger, always wear a haz-mat suit. Yes, they can get hot in 110 degrees, but it’s better than coming down with magnolia. Now, some limp-wristed do-gooders ask why we are here guarding the border when we could be working at a job. I like to quote Senators Mario Rubio and Ted Cruz who say that immigrants should be deported because they have funny last names. A few other points: When you get to the border, if the signs on the other side are in French, you’re at the wrong border. Be careful of that left-wing group known as “the press.” They will twist your words, take quotes out of contest and make you look like a mouth-breathing knuckle-dragger, so try not to drag your mouth.

Remember our motto: Lingua solo estella bueno vox Christo. (If English was good enough for Jesus, it’s good enough for Texas.)

 

Ashby is guarding ashby2@comcst.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRIDAY NIGHT MIGHT

August 11, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

THE HIGH SCHOOL — Workers are getting ready for the most important part of Texas’ high schools’ autumn term. No, not math or English or even homeroom. It’s football, of course. CBS newsman and native Texan Bob Schieffer once observed, “In Texas, the week begins on Friday nights.” Drive across our state on a fall Friday evening and, as you go through small towns, you’ll see the stadium lights, hear the bands and cheers. A sports reporter once observed that he if were a smart burglar in Texas, he’d ply his trade only in the visitor’s towns on fall Friday nights because the populace, including the cops, would be out of town at the high school’s football game.

As the Fightin’ Wombats from East Tumbleweed High begin their season, let’s look at this mammoth, extensive and expensive operation. (My local stadium is so big and splendid many a college would love to have it. Do you use a plastic mower to cut AstroTurf?) Football in Texas’ public schools grades 7-12 is run by the University Interscholastic League or UIL. There are 1,470 member schools in the League, which apparently includes every public school in the state, plus two private schools — Dallas Jesuit and Houston Strake Jesuit — schools which are too large to be a part of the private school league, so a state law allowed them to become a part of UIL. I wonder if they get to cherry-pick the best Catholic athletes in Dallas and Houston? Notre Dame would probably know. Virtually every major college has young Texans on its roster, which explains a story that, at an NCAA coaches’ convention some years ago, Duffy Daugherty of Michigan State ran into Tommy Prothro of UCLA and berated him. “What are you doing poaching players in my territory?”

To which Prothro replied, “I haven’t even been in Michigan.”

“I’m not talking about Michigan. I’m talking about Texas!”

This situation chaps me because Texas taxpayers ready these young men to play college football and then they go somewhere else. Can we send them a bill? Thus far nine former UIL players have received the Heisman Trophy including two from Dallas’ Woodrow Wilson High. Twenty-four have been inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame. It’s hard to give an exact number of UIL products playing professional football today, especially since the NFL has been in training camp and several will be cut. But it is around 150 players. One reason for the later success of our lads is that all Texas high school coaches in all sports programs must be full-time employees of the school district they coach for. And a lot of coaching there is: more than 150,000 student-athletes are in foot­ball Another plus: Texas is the only state where high school football uses NCAA rules, so there is no great change in rules between the Fightin’ Wombats and playing for the Lackluster Longhorns.

In recent years the UIL has toyed with where to stage the finals in football so that it is not too far away. That rules out El Paso and Brownsville, although neither town has had much luck in winning state football championships lately. And the stadium has to be covered. So Dallas (AT&T), San Antonio (AlamoDome) and Houston (NRG formerly Reliant Stadium) fight for the game. How big are these events? This from the UIL: Last year was the first time that all football state championship games, 11-man and 6-man, were held at the same facility (AT&T). The Texas high school football attendance record was broken during the Allen vs. Pearland game – 54,347 people showed up, no doubt a majority of them college scouts. 11-man football attendance: 221,339 (for 10 games) 6-man football attendance: 14,288 (for two games). As with my local stadium, some colleges would envy these attendance figures. Another change: This is the first year the UIL will have a Conference 6A. In football this means that all six-man football is Conference 1A and the 11-man schools are in conferences 2A through 6A. (The old line about the UIL goes: “There are better football programs, but they play on Sunday afternoons.”)

Besides football, five athletic events have state championships at The University of Texas-Austin facilities; swimming and diving, track and field, golf, softball, and baseball – only one conference of baseball and golf played at UT. The one-act play state meet and academics state meets are both held on UT’s campus as well as many music competitions. The Legislative Council voted in June to create a Game Day Cheer (Leader) Competition as a pilot program for the 2015-16 school year. Continuation of the pilot program beyond the 2015-16 school year will require formal action by the full UIL Legislative Council.

You may be wondering why we call this organization the University Interscholastic League, since linebacker Bubba McBlitz (18 years old, 6 feet 6 inches tall, 310 pounds, can bench press a VW Beetle, has trouble spelling UIL), is not university material nor scholastic. According to the Handbook of Texas, the group, which is now the oldest and largest high school association of its kind in the U.S., began life at a Texas State Teachers Association meeting in Abilene in 1910 as part of the newly created Extension Bureau of UT. Known first as the Debating League of Texas High Schools, the league expanded its functions and in 1911 became the Debating and Declamation League of Texas Schools. Athletics didn’t enter the picture until 1912 when a track and field meet – not football — was added by taking over the functions of the Interscholastic Athletic Association. Then came two public-speaking events, contests in dramatics, journalism, music, essay writing, and finally football, basketball, tennis, golf and a bunch of other events. Former UIL participants include LBJ, Ann Richards, Barbara Jordan, Earl Campbell, Bill Moyers and Sandra Day O’Connor.

Houston sports columnist Mickey Herskowitz, wrote: “There must really be something to religion. People keep comparing it to Texas high school football.” Amen.

 

Ashby competes at ashby2@comcast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dali: The Sculpture Collection

August 8, 2014 by  
Filed under Events

daliOff The Wall Gallery, Houston’s venerable and prestigious fine art gallery, is honored to announce its premiere presentation of Dali: The Sculpture Collection. The collection is on exhibition and available for acquisition beginningAugust 15, 2014 and extending through September 1st, 2014, with Previews beginning August 15.  The gallery announced two very special appearances by noted Dali expert Frank Hunter: Saturday, August 23 from 6-8pm andSunday, August 24 from 1-3pm.  This is a limited opportunity to attend the premiere presentation of the Collection, and to acquire these magnificent sculptures in a limited edition as well as the accompanying Spanish Masters artworks. The exhibition is open and complimentary to the public. For more info, visit www.offthewallgallery.com or call 713.871.0940 to RSVP.

Chili with a Healthy Twist

Growing up in Texas we ate a lot of chili, it’s just a staple, and we ate it year round….because it was EASY. Chili has a bad rap for being un-healthy but it doesn’t have to be! By swapping canned for homemade, and ground beef for turkey (you won’t taste the difference-calm down) you can still enjoy a favorite Texas food and keep your Summer waistline in check, year round. This is a great mid week meal, it freezes well, and the left overs are AHHHH-mazing.

Girl Gone Healthy’s Turkey Chili:

1 container lean ground white turkeyGGHTurkeyChili

1 medium onion chopped

1 of each red, yellow, green pepper sliced/chopped

1 medium-sized can of diced tomato {don’t drain}

1 can of green chilies {don’t drain}

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1 small can tomato paste

1 medium can of chickpeas drained, rinsed well

1 heaping tablespoon Mrs. Dash southwest/chipotle/chili seasoning whichever you can find at your market

sour cream, shredded cheese, green onions for garnish

Method:

In a large skillet/pan brown coated with cooking spray brown turkey until done, use the minced garlic during this step. While turkey is cooking saute onion and peppers in a small pan until tender, add veggies to turkey once done. Next stir diced tomato, chickpeas, tomato paste, green chilies into turkey pepper pan continually turning mixture over so that it well combined. Lastly stir in Mrs. Dash seasoning and add water if thinning is needed or until desired texture is met. Allow chili to simmer for 15 minutes or so, this will soften the chickpeas a bit and merry all of those flavors together! Ladle 1 cup servings into bowls and top with small dollop of sour cream, little sprinkle of shredded cheese and fresh-cut green onion. Eat Right Away.

Healthy Wishes, Tera

You can find more Food and a whole lot of Fitness and Attitude on www.girlgonehealthy.com

Number 13 Restaurant

August 4, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Dining

Galveston Island has a new steak and seafood restaurant that is sure to wow any food enthusiast.

New Galveston hotspot

Number 13 Prime Steak and Seafood is sure to satisfy your taste buds as well as your eyes. The food alone is fantastic and bursting with flavor. The view from the restaurant amplifies the experience. Number 13 sits on the Pelican Rest Marina that overlooks the bay and Galveston Island. Guests can enjoy great cocktails, extensive wine lists, great steak and seafood, and even more amazing desserts. Executive Chef Jason Hanin uses his talents to showcase all of the different flavors in the meat and seafood.

When ordering an appetizer I highly recommend the Chef’s Charcuterie Board. This specialty come presented on a handcrafted board served with artisan cheeses and specialty meats chosen by the chef. This appetizer is sure to please your taste buds and prepare you for an amazing main course. As a main course I would recommend The Local Grouper or any of their steak options. On the menu, guests have choice between seafood, dry aged meat or wet aged meat. The servings are large and well worth every penny spent. When you finish with your main course I would recommend ending your experience with one of their fantastic dessert options. If you are looking for a twist on a traditional family favorite, I would order the S’mores. This dessert is prepared with homemade Moist Honey Graham Cake with Chocolate Mousse, Ganache, Salted Caramel Gelato and a Torched Handmade Marshmallow that the server torches right in front of you!

photo 4Number 13 also has a terrace restaurant on top of the roof where you can enjoy a drink, and appetizer while relaxing and watching the views! This spot is perfect for Summer nights in Galveston. On the weekends, you can sit back and relax while watching the fireworks displayed by Moody Gardens.

If you are looking for a wedding reception venue, this place fits the bill! This establishment makes for a romantic reception with a sunset view of the marina and off in the distance you can see Moody Gardens as well. Recently the Restaurant opened a reception hall that is part of the Restaurant that fits up to 200 people.

General Manager John Kuit and his team do a fantastic job at customer service and guest satisfaction. When you leave, you will leave with a smile on your face and a full stomach! – Jennifer RutledgeNumber 13

THEY AIN’T JUST WHISTLING DIXIE

August 4, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

THE OFFICE WALL – Here is a veteran’s medal reading “Forrest Cavalry Corps.” Belonged to an ancestor. Other old photos, plus books and family stories reflect our past, but maybe the South won’t rise again. Schools are changing their names from Rebels to Mavericks, no one plays “Dixie” anymore, and the Emancipation Proclamation seems to be more than a passing fad. The latest example is the uproar over a ruling by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals allowing the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) to buy Texas license plates sporting their logo and name. The logo contains the flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, better known as the Confederate battle flag or the Stars and Bars. The SCV would pay the State of Texas $8,000 to issue the plates, then recoup costs with each one sold.

SCV members say they are only trying to honor their forefathers, and the judges said it was a matter of freedom of speech. Texas Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson argues that the group’s license plate “is a simple fund-raising effort by a historical association with a long history of civic involvement.” Phaedra Dugan, identified in an op/ed piece as a former Congressional staffer, argues, “That flag is not only a symbol of slavery, but it is anti-American at its very core.” Patterson is a member of the SCV. It’s not clear if Dugan has a dog in this fight or is on missionary work.

This latest kerfuffle (a Confederate soldier’s term meaning “beans again?”) begs the question: Are we still arguing over the Civil War or, as my grandmother called it, the War of Northern Aggression? Maybe it’s because no one can spell Appomattox. In any event, there are so many newcomers to Texas, we need to take another look at the Late Unpleasantness. First, unlike most of Dixie, Texas was a sideshow in the war. Only Galveston and the Battle of Sabine Pass saw action. But Texas did send 90,000 of its young men to fight in gray. In addition, 2,000 Texas men joined the Union army. (Some question these figures since white males of draft age in Texas only numbered about 100,000.) Considering the state was an under-populated frontier, Texas’ contribution was the highest percentage of soldiers of any state, north or south. Many never returned. We had a dog in that fight.

For four long and bloody years, the South held off, and sometimes defeated, the largest and best-equipped army in the world. Texas regiments fought in every major battle. When the first companies of Texas soldiers reached Richmond, Va., Confederate President Jefferson Davis greeted them by declaring, “Texans! The troops of other states have their reputations to gain, but the sons of the defenders of the Alamo have theirs to maintain.” The men of Hood’s Texas Brigade were “always favorites” of Gen. Robert E. Lee. (As a career army officer, Lee spent more time in Texas than he did in the Confederate Army.) He often praised their fighting qualities, remarking that none had brought greater honor to their native state than “my Texans.” Then his favorites went out and got shot.

I am not a member of the SCV although two of my ancestors, Gen. Turner Ashby and his younger brother and second-in-command, Capt. Richard Ashby, were both cavalry officers in the Army of Northern Virginia. In a Virginia cemetery sits a gray, granite tomb bearing crossed cavalry sabers and the inscription: “The Brothers Ashby.” They were both killed by Yankees. The tomb is easy to find, just one plot away from a similar tomb inscribed, “The Brothers Patton.” Apparently my part of the family is descended from Pvt. AWOL Ashby who was responsible for Ashby’s Rout and Ashby’s Retreat.

As for slavery in Texas, three quarters of families in antebellum Texas didn’t own slaves. Despite this, in early 1863, President Lincoln discussed with his Register of the Treasury a plan to “remove the whole colored race of the slave states into Texas.” Nothing came of it. But the planters who held many slaves constituted the state’s wealthiest class, and called the shots, on how the state was operated. Indeed, owners of 15 or more slaves were exempt from the military draft. But the planters would fight to the last poor, white boy. So why did Texas’ Johnny Rebs go marching off to war? Civil War authority Shelby Foote recounts an incident in which a Union soldier asks a Confederate prisoner why he was fighting. The Rebel responded, “Because you’re down here.” Victors write the history, so everyone knows about Andersonville, but what about Camp Douglas? It was a camp for Confederate POWs outside Chicago. A trolley line was built out to the camp and bleachers set up so Chicagoans could go out and watch the Confederate soldiers in rags behind barbed wire stumbling around in the mud. A class act.

It may surprise newcomers from the north and elsewhere to see so many places – counties, schools, parks – named after Southern leaders, and so many monuments to our boys who fought for the South. Why does Texas have a Jeff Davis County or a Confederate flag flying at UT’s stadium or the CSA seal on the Capitol’s rotunda floor? Just remember the impact on the war was much worse in the South. By 1866 you could walk around Boston or New York City or Chicago and forget there had been a war. But visit Atlanta or Richmond with their blackened ruins, even visit Texas with its occupation Union troops, and witness another story. As Alistair Cooke said in his TV series, “America,” the South wasn’t just defeated, it was destroyed – more than either Germany or Japan at the end of WW II. So, newcomer, one of the stars in the Stars and Bars is the Lone Star. Texas paid its dues to join the club. You should learn what influenced us before you arrived. Why? Because, as the Rebel soldier said, you’re down here.

 

Ashby whistles Dixie at ashby2@comcast.net

 

 

THEY AIN’T JUST WHISTLING DIXIE

August 4, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

THE OFFICE WALL – Here is a veteran’s medal reading “Forrest Cavalry Corps.” Belonged to an ancestor. Other old photos, plus books and family stories reflect our past, but maybe the South won’t rise again. Schools are changing their names from Rebels to Mavericks, no one plays “Dixie” anymore, and the Emancipation Proclamation seems to be more than a passing fad. The latest example is the uproar over a ruling by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals allowing the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) to buy Texas license plates sporting their logo and name. The logo contains the flag of the Army of Northern Virginia, better known as the Confederate battle flag or the Stars and Bars. The SCV would pay the State of Texas $8,000 to issue the plates, then recoup costs with each one sold.
SCV members say they are only trying to honor their forefathers, and the judges said it was a matter of freedom of speech. Texas Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson argues that the group’s license plate “is a simple fund-raising effort by a historical association with a long history of civic involvement.” Phaedra Dugan, identified in an op/ed piece as a former Congressional staffer, argues, “That flag is not only a symbol of slavery, but it is anti-American at its very core.” Patterson is a member of the SCV. It’s not clear if Dugan has a dog in this fight or is on missionary work.
This latest kerfuffle (a Confederate soldier’s term meaning “beans again?”) begs the question: Are we still arguing over the Civil War or, as my grandmother called it, the War of Northern Aggression? Maybe it’s because no one can spell Appomattox. In any event, there are so many newcomers to Texas, we need to take another look at the Late Unpleasantness. First, unlike most of Dixie, Texas was a sideshow in the war. Only Galveston and the Battle of Sabine Pass saw action. But Texas did send 90,000 of its young men to fight in gray. In addition, 2,000 Texas men joined the Union army. (Some question these figures since white males of draft age in Texas only numbered about 100,000.) Considering the state was an under-populated frontier, Texas’ contribution was the highest percentage of soldiers of any state, north or south. Many never returned. We had a dog in that fight.
For four long and bloody years, the South held off, and sometimes defeated, the largest and best-equipped army in the world. Texas regiments fought in every major battle. When the first companies of Texas soldiers reached Richmond, Va., Confederate President Jefferson Davis greeted them by declaring, “Texans! The troops of other states have their reputations to gain, but the sons of the defenders of the Alamo have theirs to maintain.” The men of Hood’s Texas Brigade were “always favorites” of Gen. Robert E. Lee. (As a career army officer, Lee spent more time in Texas than he did in the Confederate Army.) He often praised their fighting qualities, remarking that none had brought greater honor to their native state than “my Texans.” Then his favorites went out and got shot.
I am not a member of the SCV although two of my ancestors, Gen. Turner Ashby and his younger brother and second-in-command, Capt. Richard Ashby, were both cavalry officers in the Army of Northern Virginia. In a Virginia cemetery sits a gray, granite tomb bearing crossed cavalry sabers and the inscription: “The Brothers Ashby.” They were both killed by Yankees. The tomb is easy to find, just one plot away from a similar tomb inscribed, “The Brothers Patton.” Apparently my part of the family is descended from Pvt. AWOL Ashby who was responsible for Ashby’s Rout and Ashby’s Retreat.
As for slavery in Texas, three quarters of families in antebellum Texas didn’t own slaves. Despite this, in early 1863, President Lincoln discussed with his Register of the Treasury a plan to “remove the whole colored race of the slave states into Texas.” Nothing came of it. But the planters who held many slaves constituted the state’s wealthiest class, and called the shots, on how the state was operated. Indeed, owners of 15 or more slaves were exempt from the military draft. But the planters would fight to the last poor, white boy. So why did Texas’ Johnny Rebs go marching off to war? Civil War authority Shelby Foote recounts an incident in which a Union soldier asks a Confederate prisoner why he was fighting. The Rebel responded, “Because you’re down here.” Victors write the history, so everyone knows about Andersonville, but what about Camp Douglas? It was a camp for Confederate POWs outside Chicago. A trolley line was built out to the camp and bleachers set up so Chicagoans could go out and watch the Confederate soldiers in rags behind barbed wire stumbling around in the mud. A class act.
It may surprise newcomers from the north and elsewhere to see so many places – counties, schools, parks – named after Southern leaders, and so many monuments to our boys who fought for the South. Why does Texas have a Jeff Davis County or a Confederate flag flying at UT’s stadium or the CSA seal on the Capitol’s rotunda floor? Just remember the impact on the war was much worse in the South. By 1866 you could walk around Boston or New York City or Chicago and forget there had been a war. But visit Atlanta or Richmond with their blackened ruins, even visit Texas with its occupation Union troops, and witness another story. As Alistair Cooke said in his TV series, “America,” the South wasn’t just defeated, it was destroyed – more than either Germany or Japan at the end of WW II. So, newcomer, one of the stars in the Stars and Bars is the Lone Star. Texas paid its dues to join the club. You should learn what influenced us before you arrived. Why? Because, as the Rebel soldier said, you’re down here.

Ashby whistles Dixie at ashby2@comcast.net