LHA Events Hosts 4th Annual Lake Houston Area Home & Garden Show

January 31, 2014 by  
Filed under Events

Home & Garden show to offer community local exhibitors, seminar series and more

HOUSTON (Jan. 6, 2014) – Lake Houston Area Events (LHAE) is proud to launch the community’s fourth annual Home & Garden Show at the Humble Civic Center (8233 Will Clayton Pkwy, Humble, TX 77338), Feb. 15-16, 2014. The two-day show is designed to make the most of spring plans for home improvements, landscaping, gardening, organizing, home décor trends, furnishings and more.

During the Home & Garden show, exhibitors from around Houston will offer visitors a one-stop-shop for all things relating to building, updating, remodeling and helping homeowners live a “green” lifestyle. Notable vendors include Alspaugh’s ACE Hardware, Mattress Firm and ReBath. Vendors will feature everything needed this season for inside and outside of the home including decorating tips and home improvement tools.

The Lake Houston Area Events Home & Garden Show will also feature:

  • Speaker Johnnie Chuoke, “The Happy Handyman”
  • Thermador Chefs
  • “Go Green Zone” where companies will help visitors with home energy efficiency
  • “Shop at the Show” with cash & carry gifts and home décor
  • Seminar Series
  • Concessions
  • Free Parking
  • Live do-it-yourself home repair demonstrations
  • Ace Hardware BBQ Pit Test Drive Zone

 

“LHA Events has a strong passion for producing Home & Garden Shows and we are thrilled to bring back the Lake Houston Area Home & Garden Show for the fourth year in a row,” said Jennifer Jozwiak co-owner of LHA Events. “We are proud to provide such a great selection of vendors, speakers and other special features to the local community, just in time for spring home improvements.”

The event will take place rain or shine, and tickets for the Home & Garden show are $8 for adults and $6 for active military and seniors age 65+. Children under 16 get in free. Full event details can be found at www.LHAevents.com/lakehouston/ including an application for becoming an exhibitor and speaker information.

About Lake Houston Area Events

As Houston’s premier event and trade show production team, LHA Events, brings you this annual show. LHAE serves the Greater Houston communities of Kingwood, Atascocita, Humble, Spring, Crosby and beyond with quality trade show events. Founded in 2009, by two women with strong backgrounds in marketing and advertising, this woman-owned enterprise has been built on a desire to strengthen the backbone of America one business at a time while providing quality events that individuals and families can enjoy without traveling too far from home.  LHAE takes pride in connecting their clients with the communities they serve in a very real and personal way.  LHA Event’s trade shows and consumer expos are highly successful both from the attendee and the vendor perspective because of the great attention to detail in the planning, marketing and proper execution.  Exhibitors and guests alike benefit from and enjoy attending their quality trade shows.  For more information about LHA Events or their upcoming Home & Garden Show, visit www.LHAevents.com.

Introducing: 1836 Fest

January 31, 2014 by  
Filed under Events

1836 Fest is coming to Cottonwood in Houston, Texas on Saturday, March 8, 2014! Texas natives and newcomers will unite through a celebration of Texas music and all things Texas!

1836 Fest will have 8+ Texas artists on 2 stages! These artists represent multiple genres of music, including rock, folk, jamband, bluegrass, and country. Houston, Austin, and Dallas/Ft. Worth are all represented by the 1836 Fest artists.

The 1836 Fest venue, Cottonwood (3422 N. Shepherd Drive, Houston, Texas) and its adjacent space will be transformed into a dedication to Texas. In the main festival grounds, 1836 Fest attendees can quench their thirst with any of the 30+ craft beers from the 10+ Texas breweries and munch on eats from the best food trucks in Houston! The VIP area will feature craft cocktails made from fine Texas spirits, including Deep Eddy Vodka, Herman Marshall Whiskey, and Dulce Vida Tequila!

When:
Saturday, March 8, 2014
12:45 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

Where:
Cottonwood
3422 N. Shepherd Drive
Houston, TX

Lineup:
Sons of Fathers
Band of Heathens
J. Charles & the Trainrobbers
The Roomsounds
Shotgun Friday
Sour Bridges
The Suffers
Free Radicals 2nd Line

Brews and Spirits:
Karbach Brewing Co.
Saint Arnold Brewing Co.
Southern Star Brewing
8th Wonder Brewery
Buffalo Bayou Brewing Co.
No Label Brewing Co.
Brazos Valley Brewing Co.
Texian Brewing Co.
Cedar Creek Brewery
Leprechaun Cider Co.
Deep Eddy Vodka
Herman Marshall Whiskey
Dulce Vida Tequila

Tickets at: 1836fest.com

LOSING THE COLD WAR

January 27, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

THE PHARMACY — Sniff-sniff, cough-cough. As you might notice, I’ve got a code in de node. My eyes are red and wet, my nose looks like I’m trying out for Rudolph in the school Christmas play. I feel wretched. Yes, this is flu season and no I don’t have the flu. If I did I’d be dead or wishing I were. You may have a cold, too, so what do you do to treat it? Looking down the aisles I see boxes and bottles, tubes and more boxes holding more pills.

You remember the other week we discovered that most vitamins and treatments for Low T are hoaxes? I am looking yet another example of sheep getting fleeced. Don’t believe me? Let’s ask Mayo Clinic which knows something about health, treatments and medicine. Those experts proclaim without hesitation, “There’s no cure for the common cold.” Why doesn’t that make us feel better? You know the old saying: Treat a cold and it lasts seven days. Don’t treat it and it lasts a week. Not that we can’t do things to make us feel better, so let’s explore.

First, head colds have been around as long as people have had noses, and today the common cold is the most frequently occurring illness in the world. Estimates are that Americans suffer 1 billion colds per year, which makes them a leading cause of missed days from school, with approximately 22 million days of school absences recorded in the U.S. annually. Colds are also the leading cause for missed days at work. Don’t you hate it when a fellow worker shows up looking and sounding like I do now, to proudly proclaim: “I’m sick as a dog, but, cough-cough, I’m going to get my work done ’cause I’m a real trouper. Sneeze!” This ailment is also the Number 1 reason for doctor visits, although unless you are really sick you don’t need to see a doctor. Besides, Obamacare doesn’t cover it — the doctor, not the cold.

Here are a few things we need to know from Mayo and other experts, along with several facts we already know: Preschool children are at greatest risk of frequent colds, slightly older children are next, which brings up the question of why more elementary school teachers aren’t sick much of the time. Most people recover from a common cold in about a week or two. More than 200 different viruses can cause colds, but the biggest culprit is the rhinovirus. Just how I’m supposed to know which bug to guard against isn’t clear. The best way to come down with a cold is to stand beside someone who sneezes or coughs without using a Kleenex or at least a sleeve. Those viri thrown into the air enter your nose or mouth or, some tests show, through your eyes. The next best way to end up sick is through a third party such as touching a counter, door knob or anything recently touched by a Typhoid Mary, then touching your face. Clue: If you find yourself in the same room with a carrier, wash your hands constantly and don’t breathe.

About the only advancement on the scene is that scientists finally determined that colds are caused by a virus, so we don’t catch a cold by being cold. When I was a small tad it was generally believed that we could come down with a head cold by being out in freezing or even chilly weather. Same with sleeping with a wet head or in the wind of an air conditioner. Here’s why cold weather got the blame: It ain’t the cold, it’s the humidity, or lack thereof. Cold winter air, which is less humid than warm summer air, can dry out the mucus lining of your nasal passages, making it easier for viruses to get in and make you sick. So, while colds can occur at any time of the year, they are most common in the winter. But if it true that cold air was only the accomplice, not the criminal, why do people in humid places like Port Arthur and New Orleans get colds?

To keep things wet, besides your upper lip, get a humidifier, but it can also cause mold, fungi and bacteria if not cleaned properly. Change the water in your humidifier daily. Also, take a hot shower whether you need it or not. The steam from the hot water will help to clear your nasal passages, and help you to relax. If the heat leaves you feeling a little dizzy, consider putting a plastic chair or stool in the shower — along with a good book or maybe a small TV set. People are most contagious for the first two to three days of a cold, thus a cold is usually not contagious after the first week.

You won’t be cured, but you will feel a little better by drinking water,  juice, clear broth or warm lemon water with honey. They help loosen congestion and prevent dehydration. Now the bad news: Avoid alcohol, coffee and caffeinated sodas, which can make dehydration worse. I take hot tea with bourbon. Chicken soup might help relieve cold symptoms. Gargling saltwater can temporarily relieve a sore or scratchy throat. Nonprescription decongestants and pain relievers offer some symptom relief, but they won’t prevent a cold or shorten its length, and most have some side effects.

Warning: If nonprescription decongestants and pain relievers are used for more than a few days, they can actually make symptoms worse. Remember that acetaminophen (Tylenol and others) can cause serious liver damage or liver failure if you take them in doses higher than recommended. Don’t take antibiotics — they attack bacteria, but they’re no help against cold viruses. Avoid zinc because most studies show it does no good and may actually harm you — like losing your sense of smell.

Now which box of worthless pills do I want to buy? Sniff-sniff.

 

Ashby is cold at ashby2@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

Bayou City Art Festival March 28-30

January 27, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Events

The Bayou City Art Festival Memorial Park kicks off spring in Houston.

Touted as one of the nation’s top three annual outdoor fine art events, this three day affair boasts more than 300 national and international, juried, fine and visual performing artists including Chris Coffey, Dolan Geiman, Tanya Diskova, Randy O’Biren and Gregory Story. Working in 19 media, these artists and more will showcase their fine and pop original works ranging from decorative and functional clay to photography, pastel drawings to oil paintings, furniture to jewelry, leather goods to mixed media and sculptures with art purchases totaling more than $6 million annually.

The 19 media formats represented are: clay (decorative), clay (functional), digital (not photography), drawing/pastel, fiber/textiles, furniture (functional), glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media 2-D, mixed media 3-D, painting (acrylic or oil), painting (watercolor), photography (digital or computer manipulated), photography (traditional), printmaking (intaglio, relief and planographic), sculpture (3-D media), and wood.

Popular attractions within the festival include:

•             the Green Mountain Energy Children’s Creative Zone, an interactive area where children can explore the imaginative world of art while creating projects they can take home;

•             the Adult Creative Zone, which exhibits the work of local artists and craftsmen through artist demonstrations while providing a relaxed environment for adults to express their own creativity;

•             the Bayou City unLIMITed Stage featuring live performances from regional artists and bands;

•             the Houston Arts Alliance Cultural Stage, which highlights the cultural diversity of the performing arts programs in Houston; and

•             fine and festival fare will be offered from some of Houston’s most popular restaurants and hotels and adults can indulge in libations from top-tier sponsor Stella Artois as well as Barefoot Wines.

Now in its 43rd year, the Art Colony Association has raised more than $35 million for local nonprofit programs through the festivals. This collaborative nonprofit event puts 100 percent of the proceeds back into the community through their 15 nonprofit partners. Bayou City Art Festivals is funded in part by a grant from the City of Houston through Houston Arts Alliance.

The cost is $15.00 for adults and $3.00 for children ages 3-12. Advance tickets can be purchased at www.bayoucityartfestival.com.

19TH ANNUAL SPRING GOLF CLASSIC

January 24, 2014 by  
Filed under Events

Children’s Museum of Houston tees off during annual tournament
April 15, 2014
Chaired by Jared Crane and Krystal Crane Thompson
Honoring William J. Hill

WHAT: Grab your clubs, stretch out your backswing and say fore!  Chairs Jared Crane and Krystal Crane Thompson invite you to tee-up and enjoy a beautiful spring day on the fairway in support of Houston area kids at the Children’s Museum of Houston’s 19th Annual Spring Golf Classic on April 15 at Memorial Park Golf Course.

Since 1996, the Spring Golf Classic has served as an integral source of operating funds, allowing the Museum to continue its mission of transforming communities through innovative, child-centered learning and benefiting the Museum’s free and reduced admissions programs. Your commitment ensures the Museum can continue to provide an educational playground and resource for all of Houston’s children.   This year’s event will celebrate Houston philanthropist William J. Hill’s long-term support of the Museum.

All foursomes include lunch, on-course refreshments, post-tournament hors d’oeuvres and a Children’s Museum of Houston Spring Golf Classic Nike shirt.

 

COST: Foursomes for the Florida scramble style tournament are available for $5,000, $2,500 and $1,500.  Also, a limited number of hole sponsorships are available for $1,000 for those who wish to support the Museum’s efforts without playing a round.

 

WHEN: Tuesday, April 15, 2014

10 a.m. – Registration

Noon  – Shotgun start

 

WHERE: Memorial Park Golf Course

1001 Memorial Loop East

Houston, TX  77007

 

MORE: To reserve a team, contact Emma Ebbs at (713) 535-7269 or eebbs@cmhouston.org

MD Anderson Regional Care Centers promote cancer prevention at inaugural Ride of a Lifetime fitness event

January 22, 2014 by  
Filed under Events

Saturday, March 22 at CITYCENTRE

WHAT:           MD Anderson Regional Care Centers are partnering with LIFE TIME to promote cancer prevention through exercise and a healthy lifestyle during their outdoor Ride of a Lifetime event in the CITYCENTRE plaza. Participants will enjoy a high-energy cycling class followed by a free, one-hour Zumba celebration. The event will also feature live entertainment, speakers and free giveaways (details below).

WHEN:           Saturday, March 22 from 6-10 p.m.
                        Cycling – 6-8 p.m.
Zumba – 8:30-9:30 p.m.

WHERE:         CITYCENTRE Plaza
815 Town & Country Lane
Houston, TX 77024

ACTION:         Online registration for cycling and RSVP for Zumba opens Jan. 20 at www.MDAndersonROLT.com.

COST:             General admission to event and the Zumba celebration are FREE and open to the public.

The two-hour cycle portion of the event is $55, and all participants will receive an MD Anderson Regional Care Centers cycling jersey made exclusively for the event. Space is limited to 300 cyclists, so participants are urged to register quickly.

MORE:            The entire plaza will be set aglow in red lighting as the sun goes down, with a laser light show starting at 7 p.m. Additional elements include a photo booth for complimentary souvenir photos, free red glow necklaces, and the interactive Strikeout Cancer Art Wall . MD Anderson physicians will be on site during the event to answer questions related to cancer prevention and the services offered at the regional care centers. Refreshments will be provided to all cyclists courtesy of LIFE TIME.

WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE

January 20, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

THE TV SET — “The snow will hit further south, near Ree-FUGE-ee-oh.” I am told that a third to a half of all TV weather people are graduates of Mississippi State. Maybe there should be a course called Etymology 101 which would teach future forecasters how to be right 10 percent of the time with a chance of scattered screw ups.  Refugio is tough, and so is Mexia and Nacogdoches, but would the students please be taught the difference in further and farther? Further is invisible and means going for more, as in: “Further studies are needed on this matter.” Farther is distance, measurable, going from here to Ree-FHUR-ee-oh.

While we’re at it, let’s clean up the English language. Do you know when and how to use whom? It is preferable in the past pluperfect nominative tense, which means only English graduates know how to speak the word properly. Example: “To whom do I have the pleasure of meeting? Welcome to Wal-Mart.” Abbott never asked Costello, “Whom’s on first?” Whom is one of those words we should toss out. Who is good enough for all cases. We no longer need wench, blackguard and the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii). Getting rid of unused and unneeded words is not new. We toss them all the time: whence and thence and shan’t. Our children have abandoned please and thank you. You probably haven’t used drollic lately. It means of or pertaining to puppet shows. Impigrity means quickness or speed which pigs are not — unless you include javelinas.

Here is a much-misused term. “Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein used poison gas against his own people!” When speaking of the Syrian civil war, every newscaster trots out: “Bashar al-Assad used chemical warfare against his own people!” No. They aren’t his own people and don’t want to be. This is like saying: “President Abraham Lincoln turned the world’s largest army against his own people.” Under Lincoln’s authority, between 258,000 and 490,309 (who’s counting?) Confederate soldiers died in that war and I’ll bet not one of them considered themselves Lincoln’s own people. Let my people go.

On Jan. 15, 1999, David Howard, a white aide to the black mayor of Washington, D.C., used “niggardly” in reference to a budget. The word is of Scandinavian origin and means stingy, miserly. Nevertheless, Howard was accused of racism and fired. If you “could care less” then you have not yet hit the  bottom of your indifference. The term is, “I couldn’t care less.” How often do you use the word ethos? The late T.R. Fehrenbach used ethos quite often in his wonderful book, “Lone Star.” In Winston Churchill’s “History of the English Speaking People,” he liked to break out exhausted to describe every country after every war. No doubt that was true, but about 50 years into the Hundred Years War I became exhausted reading exhausted. Churchill did win the Nobel Prize for Literature, but whose side are you going to take? What’s the difference in flammable and inflammable? None. We all know the line about the opposites of pro is con. So what’s the opposite of progress? Shop worn, but true.

It’s probably been at least a week since you used the word ersatz. It means an  artificial and inferior substitute or imitation, and every single story about Germany in WW II used “ersatz coffee” at least twice. Must have been required by the Gestapo. If you are not discrete are you crete? I have trouble using the word nonplussed — a state of perplexity, confusion, or bewilderment. If I know what’s happening am I plussed?

Preplanned is a useless word. Everything planned is preplanned. You may past-plan, but by then you’re too late. Yet preplanned is used constantly by people who don’t know better.

Naughty used to mean bad, up to no good, ugly. Shakespeare in “The Merchant of Venice”: “How far that little candle throws its beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.” Today we use naughty to describe a mischievous child. Erstwhile and penultimate have been savagely misused. Some people think erstwhile mean earnest or  really into it. Not even close. Erstwhile means former, one-time or even long ago.  Penultimate is not the ultimate of ultimate but quite the reverse, next to last place. I find it most annoying for someone to refer to himself or another as “one.” As in: “I should think one would know better.” Or: “When one makes such a decision…” The Brits can get away with it, but coming out of the mouth of Billy Bob or LeRoy it is an affectation. Does he like the colour of one’s boot in one’s lorry?

Do not say, write or think anything is literal or literally unless it actually happens. That’s what literally means, so don’t dilute the word by saying, “I was literally awash in frogs,” unless you can produce a photo of you awash in said frogs. This word gets so overused. “I was literally on pins and needles.” No you were not, nor were you literally at death’s door, nor is your hair literally on fire, unless you can smell the smoke.

It was the aforementioned W. Churchill who wrote, “Broadly speaking, the short words are the best, and the old words best of all.” The best are old, short words, like blood, sweat and tears. Of course, the quicker among us will point out that Churchill never said that. True, it gave a rock band its title, but what he actually said was, “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears, and sweat.” Incidentally, Humphrey Bogart never said, “Play it again, Sam” in “Casablanca.” And more incidentally, Sam was played by Arthur “Dooley” Wilson who was from Tyler. He was a drummer and couldn’t play the piano, so you never see his hands.

It is clear that the farther one gets into the English language the more it colours one’s preplanning, but frankly I could care less.

 

Ashby mangles the language at ashby2@comcast.net

 

 

BEAT THE PRESS

January 13, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

Today let’s briefly discuss Tetyana Chornovol, Sanderson, Texas, Clint, what we all have in common and why we should care. It has to do with the press and newspapers, just like the one you are holding right now. We shall start with Tetyana Chornovol, but we can’t really talk to her. She’s under heavy medication in a hospital in Kiev, Ukraine, having been savagely beaten by some government thugs who get delight in smashing 34-year-old female journalists with fists and clubs. She became famous last year after documenting the opulence of the heavily guarded residential compound of Ukrainian President Viktor F. Yanukovich. Photographs taken in a hospital where Chornovol was said to be undergoing surgery showed her lying on a bed, her face battered and bloodied, with one eye blackened and shut, and her lips hugely swollen and cut. A well-deserved fix, don’t you agree?

Next we have the dusty West Texas town of Sanderson (pop. 900 and dropping). It is 67 miles south of Fort Stockton, which, itself, is not close to anything. Sanderson lost most stores, including Kerr Mercantile, and the Ford dealership. Its 11-man football team became 6-man. Then its local newspaper, the Terrell County News-Leader, shut down in July, leaving only a public bulletin board for local news. That was too much for the Sandersonians. Some of them got together and created the Terrell County Sun, which hit the streets in early December.  (The newspaper is non-profit, just like General Motors and BlackBerry.) “When I saw that first edition, I said, ‘This a collector’s item, this is historical.’ I dang near cried,” said County Commissioner Kenn Norris. “You miss it because a newspaper creates some buzz in town.” So the buzz is back in Sanderson.

This brings us to one of my reader(s), Clint. He wrote me a letter much like those received by accountants, pediatricians and violinists: “Want to print something virtuous? Write an article pointing out that it is biased, inaccurate and agenda-based letters written by people like yourself. . . . All you guys would have to do is do your job instead of lie… And you would be rolling in the huge ratings and practically be heroes to the country instead of its enemies, always screaming ‘it’s my first amendment right to say what I want!’ then championing the public persecution of Phil Robertson for doing the exact dame (sic) thing you hypocrites.” I side with Clint rather than the people of Sanderson. Who needs newspapers?

As for Tetyana Chornovol, she shouldn’t feel special. At least she’s alive and not even in jail. The Committee to Protect Journalists or CPJ said in a recent report that a record-number 232 journalists are imprisoned worldwide and that Turkey has the highest number with 49 journalists behind bars. The total is 53 more than the tally last year and is the highest number since the organization began conducting worldwide surveys in 1990. The census of journalists behind bars on Dec. 1 found that anti-state charges such as terrorism, treason and subversion were the most common brought against journalists in 2013. At least 132 journalists are being held around the world on such charges, CPJ said. Good, lock ’em up and throw away their curiosity.

Among the worst jailers of the press is Iran, with 45 behind bars. The group cited news reports that said Iranian blogger Sattar Beheshti was arrested in October and died after being beaten and hung by his limbs from the ceiling. The overwhelming majority of the 232 detainees are local journalists being held by their own governments. Just three foreign journalists were on the list. Who said the pen is mightier than the sword? Hehehe.

The saga of jailed journalist is not limited to the dungeons of  tyrannies. Vanessa Leggett was a writer who, in 1996, investigated a Houston murder case to write a book about it. She refused to hand over her notes to the FBI and she spent a record (then) 168 days in a federal prison. During that time there were three journalists in prison in the Western Hemisphere for doing their jobs. Two were in Cuba. The third was in Houston, Texas.

Then there are those who reached their own deadlines. The CPJ reports that70 journalists were killed in the line of duty in 2013. In 2012 the number was 74. In past years it’s reached 117. I don’t know of any other civilian profession that keeps such death totals — or needs to. Next time you are in Washington visiting your money, drop by the Newseum, an exhibition given over to journalism. It’s a fun place filled with the Fourth Estates’ mistakes, stupid stories and bad headlines: “Dewey Defeats Truman.” There are also less-funny items like the eyeglasses, pencil and notebook of Mark Kellogg. He was an AP reporter assigned to cover Custer at Littlebig Horn, and, no, he didn’t side with the Indians. There is also a wall covered with the names of journalists killed in the line of duty. But the name of William Cowper Brann isn’t there. He was a Waco newspaper editor. In 1898 he was gunned down on a street corner by an irate reader. After he was buried, someone fired a bullet into his tombstone.

Yes, the world would be a better place without reporters, editors and the press in general. They keep telling us things we’d rather not know. Don’t take my word for it. Consider this observation by one of the major players of the 20th Century. “Why should freedom of speech and freedom of the press be allowed? Why should a government which is doing what it believes to be right allow itself to be criticized? It would not allow opposition by lethal weapons. Ideas are much more fatal things than guns. Why should any man be allowed to buy a printing press and disseminate pernicious opinion calculated to embarrass the government?” – Nicolai Vladmir Lenin. Hey, Nick, meet Clint. Y’all have a lot in common.

 

Ashby hides at ashby2@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

BUGGED BY DRUGS

January 6, 2014 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

THE MEDICINE CABINET — This is a warning about your health, money, and overly hyped, totally useless bad things we are doing to our body, because Big Pharma, in cahoots with some doctors, is making a fortune selling snake oil, and we are buying it by the billions. I’m taking vitamin A for reduced anger. B for induced bellicosity which is why I take A. Then I take C to counter cancer. Next I take D through U daily for reasons I can’t remember. However, I also take newspapers, and here is an article saying that a new study is out by five world-renowned scientific researchers who say, and I quote: “Stop wasting your money.” The scientists have gone through other studies and made their own on the value of us taking vitamins, and we do take them. Between 1988 and 1994, some 42 percent of us swallowed these supplements daily. Between 2003 and 2006, that figure rose to 50 percent, where it stands today — one out of every two of us. In 2011 that came to $30 billion worth of mostly worthless pills.

Indeed, the study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, says some of these pills may actually do more harm than good. (Dietary supplements account for nearly 20 percent of drug-related liver injuries that turn up in hospitals, up from 7 percent a decade ago.) The researchers give a neutral to vitamin D because they can’t prove its usefulness either way. As for the others, there is no doubt, or as they say, scientifically, “The message is simple. Most supplements do not prevent chronic disease or death, their use is not justified and they should be avoided.” Adding, if there is any doubt, “The case is closed.” So is my vitamin cabinet.

Does your child have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? Do you? Absolutely. ADHD is running through our society in epidemic proportions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say the diagnosis has been made in 15 percent of high school-age children, and that the number of children on medication for the disorder had soared from 600,000 in1990 to 3.5 million today. Why? A hint: The most prominent medical publication in the field, The Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, went from no ads for ADHD medications between 1990 and 1993 to about 100 pages per year a decade later. Almost every full-page color ad was for an ADHD drug. “The numbers (of pills) make it look like an epidemic. Well, it’s not. It’s preposterous,” said Dr. Keith Conners, a psychologist and professor emeritus at Duke University. “This is a concoction to justify the giving out of medication at unprecedented and unjustifiable levels.”

Why have we been taking all these pills? Yet another clue: The prosperous international pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline (one word) said it will no longer pay doctors and health care professionals to speak on its behalf about its products or the diseases they treat “to audiences who can prescribe or influence prescribing.” Apparently this is common practice in Big Pharma — paying doctors and scientific researchers to tell other docs how good the company’s $100-a-pill is. Wow, is that an eye-opener (UJ-8 Eye-Openers, $45 a pop). Next time your doctor prescribes some wonder pill, ask about his/her all-expense-paid trip to Monaco for that medical convention and panel discussion.

After all this pill popping I need to wash my hands. But first let me finish this other article in the paper: “After more than 40 years of study, the U.S. government says it has found no evidence that common antibacterial soaps prevent the spread of germs, and regulators want the makers of Dawn, Dial and other household staples to prove that their products do not pose health risks to consumers.” Huh? The FDA lab rats say they are taking a second and third look at triclosan and other sanitizing agents found in soap in America’s kitchens and bathrooms. That includes yours. It’s not just Dawn and Dial that are suspect. Tricolsan is used in all sorts of household cleaning products for its allegedly germ-killing power. The FDA says it may be no better than hot water and soap, and may even be worse: Recent studies show triclosan and similar substances can spur the growth of drug-resistant bacteria. Spur the growth? We’re actually fertilizing the little bugs.

What we are seeing is a TV-commercial-led juggernaut telling us to take this or that pill or underarm jell or use some antibacterial soaps to be healthy and live longer and cleaner. But what these researchers have found is that so much of it is snake oil sold by con artists whom we believe to have our best interests at heart. They put someone in a white lab coat with a stethoscope around his or her neck, gray hair, maybe a mustache, (on the women) and they’ve got gravitas, telling us to pop this pill. Be careful when you hear, “Some studies suggest. . .” Suggest? These studies right here declare just the opposite. We are being conned. “Stop wasting your money.”

Men, are you a bit tired after running a 24-mile marathon? Do you sweat in a sauna? Then you might have Low T! Yes, I’ve saved the worst for last. We  now live in a testosterone time, when billions of dollars are spent telling men over 40 that they are over 40. TV ads cover sports and the evening news, where the geezers dwell. It’s working. Between 2001 and 2011, American males 40 years or older increased their use of the hormone testosterone as a topical gel more than five times. IMS Health, a health care information company, says the marketing of Low T helped propel sales of testosterone gels, patches and such to about $2 billion in the U.S. last year. In 2002, sales were a mere $324 million. I’d take a skeptical pill, but they tell me I’m too tired.

 

Ashby is High T at ashby2@comcst.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Lynn Ashby                                             6 Jan. 2014

 

BUGGED BY DRUGS

 

THE MEDICINE CABINET — This is a warning about your health, money, and overly hyped, totally useless bad things we are doing to our body, because Big Pharma, in cahoots with some doctors, is making a fortune selling snake oil, and we are buying it by the billions. I’m taking vitamin A for reduced anger. B for induced bellicosity which is why I take A. Then I take C to counter cancer. Next I take D through U daily for reasons I can’t remember. However, I also take newspapers, and here is an article saying that a new study is out by five world-renowned scientific researchers who say, and I quote: “Stop wasting your money.” The scientists have gone through other studies and made their own on the value of us taking vitamins, and we do take them. Between 1988 and 1994, some 42 percent of us swallowed these supplements daily. Between 2003 and 2006, that figure rose to 50 percent, where it stands today — one out of every two of us. In 2011 that came to $30 billion worth of mostly worthless pills.

Indeed, the study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, says some of these pills may actually do more harm than good. (Dietary supplements account for nearly 20 percent of drug-related liver injuries that turn up in hospitals, up from 7 percent a decade ago.) The researchers give a neutral to vitamin D because they can’t prove its usefulness either way. As for the others, there is no doubt, or as they say, scientifically, “The message is simple. Most supplements do not prevent chronic disease or death, their use is not justified and they should be avoided.” Adding, if there is any doubt, “The case is closed.” So is my vitamin cabinet.

Does your child have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? Do you? Absolutely. ADHD is running through our society in epidemic proportions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say the diagnosis has been made in 15 percent of high school-age children, and that the number of children on medication for the disorder had soared from 600,000 in1990 to 3.5 million today. Why? A hint: The most prominent medical publication in the field, The Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, went from no ads for ADHD medications between 1990 and 1993 to about 100 pages per year a decade later. Almost every full-page color ad was for an ADHD drug. “The numbers (of pills) make it look like an epidemic. Well, it’s not. It’s preposterous,” said Dr. Keith Conners, a psychologist and professor emeritus at Duke University. “This is a concoction to justify the giving out of medication at unprecedented and unjustifiable levels.”

Why have we been taking all these pills? Yet another clue: The prosperous international pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline (one word) said it will no longer pay doctors and health care professionals to speak on its behalf about its products or the diseases they treat “to audiences who can prescribe or influence prescribing.” Apparently this is common practice in Big Pharma — paying doctors and scientific researchers to tell other docs how good the company’s $100-a-pill is. Wow, is that an eye-opener (UJ-8 Eye-Openers, $45 a pop). Next time your doctor prescribes some wonder pill, ask about his/her all-expense-paid trip to Monaco for that medical convention and panel discussion.

After all this pill popping I need to wash my hands. But first let me finish this other article in the paper: “After more than 40 years of study, the U.S. government says it has found no evidence that common antibacterial soaps prevent the spread of germs, and regulators want the makers of Dawn, Dial and other household staples to prove that their products do not pose health risks to consumers.” Huh? The FDA lab rats say they are taking a second and third look at triclosan and other sanitizing agents found in soap in America’s kitchens and bathrooms. That includes yours. It’s not just Dawn and Dial that are suspect. Tricolsan is used in all sorts of household cleaning products for its allegedly germ-killing power. The FDA says it may be no better than hot water and soap, and may even be worse: Recent studies show triclosan and similar substances can spur the growth of drug-resistant bacteria. Spur the growth? We’re actually fertilizing the little bugs.

What we are seeing is a TV-commercial-led juggernaut telling us to take this or that pill or underarm jell or use some antibacterial soaps to be healthy and live longer and cleaner. But what these researchers have found is that so much of it is snake oil sold by con artists whom we believe to have our best interests at heart. They put someone in a white lab coat with a stethoscope around his or her neck, gray hair, maybe a mustache, (on the women) and they’ve got gravitas, telling us to pop this pill. Be careful when you hear, “Some studies suggest. . .” Suggest? These studies right here declare just the opposite. We are being conned. “Stop wasting your money.”

Men, are you a bit tired after running a 24-mile marathon? Do you sweat in a sauna? Then you might have Low T! Yes, I’ve saved the worst for last. We  now live in a testosterone time, when billions of dollars are spent telling men over 40 that they are over 40. TV ads cover sports and the evening news, where the geezers dwell. It’s working. Between 2001 and 2011, American males 40 years or older increased their use of the hormone testosterone as a topical gel more than five times. IMS Health, a health care information company, says the marketing of Low T helped propel sales of testosterone gels, patches and such to about $2 billion in the U.S. last year. In 2002, sales were a mere $324 million. I’d take a skeptical pill, but they tell me I’m too tired.

 

Ashby is High T at ashby2@comcst.net