iRitmo Latino! featuring Quetzal

April 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Events

May 4, 8-10:30 p.m.

Miller Outdoor Theatre

The sound of Los Angeles band Quetzal is as rich and complex as their pluri-ethnic barrio experience. Their combination of community activism and creative compositions has allowed them to travel the world using music as a tool for creating a global network of musicians committed to building community. Standing on the shoulders of giants like Lalo Guerrero, Ritchie Valens, Cannibal and The Headhunters, The Brat, Los Lobos and many others, Quetzal has created a path that has earned them the title of “one of Los Angeles’ most important bands”(Los Angeles Times).

Presented by Society for the Performing Arts

There’s something for everyone on stage at Miller Outdoor Theatre in Hermann Park. From daytime programs especially for young children to family friendly evening performances of music, dance, theatre and more, this is Houston’s best entertainment value. Admission is FREE!
For a complete schedule, visit www.milleroutdoortheatre.com.

Free tickets are available on a first-come first-serve basis (four per person over age 16 while they last) at the Miller Outdoor Theatre box office the day of the performance between the hours of 10:30 a.m.―1 p.m. for assigned seating under the canopy. If tickets remain at 1 p.m., the box office will re-open one hour before show time to distribute the remaining tickets. As always, open seating on the hill.

Under normal circumstances, all unoccupied/unclaimed seats are released five minutes before the show is scheduled to begin. We encourage all patrons to be in their assigned seats at least 10 minutes before showtime to insure that their seat is not released. Again, there is NO charge for tickets. Tickets may not be reserved by phone. Only four (4) tickets per person. At managements’ discretion, all unoccupied seats may be released at any time for any reason.

The Clever Wife – A Chinese Folktale

April 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Events

April 30 – May 4, 11 a.m.

Miller Outdoor Theatre

Can a woman be a hero? Based on a popular Chinese folktale, this world premiere opera explores the difference between wisdom and knowledge when a young wife must rescue her foolish husband from a magistrate’s impossible tasks. Music by Mary Carol Warwick, Libretto by Hugh Behm-Steinberg, and commissioned by Donna and Robert Bruni for elementary and middle schools.

Produced by Houston Grand Opera

There’s something for everyone on stage at Miller Outdoor Theatre in Hermann Park.  From daytime programs especially for young children to family friendly evening performances of music, dance, theatre and more, this is Houston’s best entertainment value.  Admission is FREE!
For a complete schedule, visit www.milleroutdoortheatre.com.

Free tickets are available on a first-come first-serve basis (four per person over age 16 while they last) at the Miller Outdoor Theatre box office the day of the performance between the hours of 10:30 a.m.―1 p.m. for assigned seating under the canopy. If tickets remain at 1 p.m., the box office will re-open one hour before show time to distribute the remaining tickets. As always, open seating on the hill.

Under normal circumstances, all unoccupied/unclaimed seats are released five minutes before the show is scheduled to begin. We encourage all patrons to be in their assigned seats at least 10 minutes before showtime to insure that their seat is not released. Again, there is NO charge for tickets. Tickets may not be reserved by phone. Only four (4) tickets per person. At managements’ discretion, all unoccupied seats may be released at any time for any reason.

Bayou City Outdoors Meet & Greet

April 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Events

May 24
Bayou City Outdoors Meet & Greet
Zimm’s Little Deck
601 Richmond Avenue  Houston, TX 77006
6:30 – 9:00PM

Zimm’s Little Deck is the perfect spot for a Meet & Greet. There are two huge bacci ball courts or you can just enjoy mingling with BCO members and non-members on their expansive patio. Zimm’s has some great happy hour specials including $2 Tecates, $4 wines, and $1 oyster plates.

6:30 – 9:00PM; Zimm’s Little Deck, 601 Richmond Avenue  Houston, TX 77006.
Parking is in the lot or on the street. Details and RSVP at www.BayouCityOutdoors.com or call 713-524-3567.

Bayou City Outdoors Hiking In Houston

April 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Events

May 20
Bayou City Outdoors Hiking In Houston
Cleveland Park, Scotland St. & Jackson
Houston Tx 77007

Want to go hiking without having to travel outside of the city? Come discover all the trails and hideaways along the Buffalo Bayou! Get lost exploring the winding flat trails, bridges, and modest hills while exercising at an easy to moderate pace. Along this 6 mile hike we will pass the bat viewing area, art sculptures, and maybe even one of the rumored Buffalo Bayou alligators or Osprey couples!
We meet at Cleveland Park on the north side of Memorial Dr., there is a foot-walkway over Memorial here. The hike will start here and then we head towards downtown on the north side of the bayou. There is parking along the street for free.

When we reach downtown, we’ll stop for a water/coffee break so bring a few dollars. At the end of the hike you will have worked hard, made new friends and discovered all sorts of Houston secrets along Buffalo Bayou in our Bayou city!
As long as it is cool outside, this is a dog-friendly event for your canine friends who are up for six miles.
Free for Members and Non-Members alike. Meet at 8:15AM; depart 8:30AM on the dot! Cleveland Park, Scotland St. & Jackson RSVP & Directions to Jackson Park www.BayouCityOutdoors.com

Bayou City Outdoors Farmer’s Market Bike Ride

April 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Events

May 19
Bayou City Outdoors Farmer’s Market Bike Ride
Onion Creek,
3106 White Oak Dr, Houston, TX 77007

Come out and stretch your legs biking to the Farmer’s Markets of Houston to shop for local organic produce! Hop on your bike and let’s take a ride through the side streets, trails, and residential areas in the heart of Houston. This is a very social ride and all levels of riders are welcome. We will start the morning off with coffee at Onion Creek and then cruise through 2-3 markets to shop for fresh produce, sauces, jams, and bread. This is a 12-15 mile ride that lasts about three hours so bring plenty of water and a backpack to carry your goodies! If you’d like to join us but don’t own a bike, West End Bicycles rents bikes for $25 per day at 713/861-2271 or www.westendbikes.com.

If you are a member of Bayou City Outdoors and do not have a bike, we can loan you a bike for the ride. But you MUST call the office one week in advance to arrange for the loaner bike. Meet at Onion Creek, 3106 White Oak Dr, Houston, TX 77007. Please DO NOT park in the Onion Creek lot – there is parking on the surrounding streets but look out for ‘no parking’ signs. Meet at 8:00AM – leave at 8:30AM – Noon. Free for Members and Non-Members alike. RSVP 713-524-3567 or www.BayouCityOutdoors.com

Bayou City Outdoors Farmer’s Market Ride

April 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Events

April 28
Bayou City Outdoors Farmer’s Market Ride
Onion Creek,
3106 White Oak Dr, Houston, TX 77007

Come out and stretch your legs biking to the Farmer’s Markets of Houston to shop for local organic produce! Hop on your bike and let’s take a ride through the side streets, trails, and residential areas in the heart of Houston. This is a very social ride and all levels of riders are welcome. We will start the morning off with coffee at Onion Creek and then cruise through 2-3 markets to shop for fresh produce, sauces, jams, and bread. This is a 12-15 mile ride that lasts about three hours so bring plenty of water and a backpack to carry your goodies! If you’d like to join us but don’t own a bike, West End Bicycles rents bikes for $25 per day at 713/861-2271 or www.westendbikes.com.

If you are a member of Bayou City Outdoors and do not have a bike, we can loan you a bike for the ride. But you MUST call the office one week in advance to arrange for the loaner bike. Meet at Onion Creek, 3106 White Oak Dr, Houston, TX 77007. Please DO NOT park in the Onion Creek lot – there is parking on the surrounding streets but look out for ‘no parking’ signs. Meet at 8:00AM – leave at 8:30AM – Noon. Free for Members and Non-Members alike. RSVP 713-524-3567 or www.BayouCityOutdoors.com

Bayou City Outdoors Meet & Greet

April 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Events

April 27
Bayou City Outdoors Meet & Greet
Boheme
307 Fairview  Houston, TX 77006
6:30 – 9:00PM

Truly one of the coolest spots in Houston, Boheme offers great food and drink in an artistic atmosphere. Join BCO in the large sculpture-garden patio for a happy hour. Boheme has great specials on wines, light bites, and a full bar. Become a little Bohemian as you meet & greet your fellow BCO members and non-members.

6:30 – 9:00PM; Boheme, 307 Fairview  Houston, TX 77006. Parking is in the lot behind Boheme, along the street and in the Hyde Park Grocery parking lot – caddy corner to Boheme. Details and RSVP at www.BayouCityOutdoors.com or call 713-524-3567

Florida’s Gulf Islands

April 3, 2012 by  
Filed under Blogs, Travel Blog

This string of quaint beach towns is the ideal escape

Rent a car to peruse Anna Maria Island.  The folks at Cedar Cove Resort will welcome you like old friends.  If you arrive late, the key will be waiting for you by the office door. A casual meal at Ginny & Jane E’s at the Old IGA will kick off your trip.  Searching for manatees?  A guided kayak tour of Palma Sola Bay with Anna Maria Island Eco Tours should top your list.  Dining at The Beach Bistro and dessert at Euphemia Haye are culinary highlights.

@VisitBradenton

 

SCRAPING BY

April 2, 2012 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

INTERSTATE 10 — The cars and trucks speed along here on a bright and cheery spring day. The grass is green, the bluebonnets are blooming. The sky is blue. All is well in Texas. But we are not out here today to smell the flowers, or the diesel fumes. No, once again we come to this highway between San Antonio and Houston to briefly remember an event which took place here long ago, then we can go back to sweating who wins “American Idol.”
We all know about the fall of the Alamo (March 6) and the Battle of San Jacinto (April 21), but tend to forget the time in between. It was called the Runaway Scrape, when Texians – as they were then known – literally ran for their lives. First, let’s set the stage: As early as Jan. 4, 1836, settlers around San Antonio and today’s Corpus Christi got word that the Mexican Army had crossed the Rio Grande and was heading northward. Delegates had gathered at Washington-on-the-Brazos to draw up a constitution when word arrived that the Alamo had fallen. That gave impetus to the evacuation.
Most Texas men had joined Sam Houston’s army, so women, children and old men started trudging towards the safety of the United States, i.e., Louisiana. Using everything from ox carts to worn-out horses or just on foot, the rag-tag citizens moved over what passed for roads, enduring rain, temperatures as low as 33 degrees, hunger and disease. Many died on the way and were simply buried along the roadside. Doctors were scarce since most of them, too, had joined the army. Not only were the refugees afraid of the Mexican Army, there were warring Indians around.
On March 11, Houston moved his army east to the Colorado River and ordered all civilian Texians to do the same. The Constitution was signed on March 15, and by March 17 Washington-on-the-Brazos was deserted. San Felipe de Austin, the biggest town around with five stores and 30 houses, was burned to the ground by its inhabitants before they left. Others also followed a scorched earth policy, leaving Santa Anna’s soldiers practically starving. Richmond was abandoned by April 1. All settlements between the Brazos and the Colorado were emptied. By April 2, the prairie near Lynch’s Ferry (today’s Lynchburg Ferry near the Houston Ship Channel), was covered by refugees with their horses, wagons, mules, baggage and tents. About April 13, San Augustine and Nacogdoches were abandoned as the inhabitants fled east.
Gen. Houston kept retreating, much to the annoyance of the Army, whose officers almost mutinied. The interim Texas government was also dissatisfied with their general. President David G. Burnet addressed a scathing letter to Houston: “Sir: The enemy are laughing you to scorn. You must fight them. You must retreat no further. The country expects you to fight. The salvation of the country depends on your doing so.” Sam kept retreating, but he also kept a detailed expense account and then sent it to the government for reimbursement. Two saddles, five barrels of corn, powder, shot, all of that. The government would not reimburse Houston $2.50 for the in-flight movie.
Among those on the trek were brothers Gail and Thomas Borden, publishers of the Telegraph and Texas Register. The paper, strongly for an independent Texas, first published the Texas Declaration of Independence. It ran letters to the editor: “God and Texas – Victory or Death! W. Barret Travis, Lt. Col. Comm.” And on March 24, 1836, it reported: “. . . the darkness of death occupied the memorable Alamo.” When the Texas Army retreated, the Bordens put their press in an ox cart and joined the Runaway Scrape. The paper arrived in Harrisburg (there was no city of Houston) and had printed only six copies of the latest edition when Santa Anna’s troops entered the town. The Bordens escaped but three printers, still at work, were captured. The press was thrown into the bayou.
Meantime, the two armies had a few scattered skirmishes as they entered today’s Harris County, and camped here and there. The Texas Army entered the area from the northwest via Bastrop, Hempstead and southwest to San Jacinto. Part of the Mexican Army came through Goliad and Richmond, another came up from the south around Columbia. Looking at maps tracing the routes, it appears both armies wandered over half the county before meeting on April 21.
It was not an easy trek in the mud and muck. Yet, on occasion, the Texas countryside would warm, the sun came out and flowers blossomed. The soldiers were touched by the beauty of Texas. Col. Francisco González Pavón ordered his men not to harm what was left of Gonzales because he wanted his regiment to return and set up a colony there after the war.
“If the banks of the Guadalupe, going from Bejar (San Antonio) to (San Felipe de) Austin are extremely beautiful, because of the winding of the river, and undulation of the woods, all of which created a beautiful contrast with its green valley, the areas in which the town of Gonzales was situated is no less pleasant,” Lt. Col. Jose de la Pena, an officer with Santa Anna, wrote. He went on to observe, “Had we been well organized, the Texas campaign would have been a delightful trek, a series of pleasant days in the country interspersed with military maneuvers.” They were not well organized. Santa Anna lost and was captured in today’s Pasadena, about a mile north of State Highway 225.
Word of the victory reached the refugees before most got to Louisiana. There had been so many rumors that it took time for the news to sink in. The Runaway Scrape was over. The miserable lines turned back to the ashes of their homes and memories of their dead kin, and started all over again. Whether we have blood lines or not, we are their descendants and we should remember what happened during that spring in Texas.

Ashby retreats at ashby2@comcast.net

21st Annual Luncheon

April 2, 2012 by  
Filed under Events

Wednesday, May 9, 2012 

11:30 AM–1:00 PM at the Hilton Post Oak.

We hope you will join us for an intriguing and insightful Conversation with Barbara Ehrenreich, which will include a speech and audience Q & A.  Barbara’s deep rooted passion, profound ability to spur discussion, and her signature sense of humor are certain not to disappoint!  At the podium, Barbara reflects with biting humor on her journey as a writer and activist.  She will take the audience inside her Nickel and Dimed experience by sharing anecdotes and lessons learned from each of her powerful books.

Barbara is the author of 21 books, including the New York Times best sellers, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America and Bright-Sided: How Positive Thinking Is Undermining America.  She is a frequent contributor to the New York Times, Harpers, the Progressive and Time magazine, and has appeared on Oprah, The Daily Show, The Colbert Report and The Joy Behar Show, to name a few. Instantly acclaimed for its insight, humor, and passion, Nickel and Dimed changed the way America perceives its working poor.  More information about Barbara is attached.

If you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact Danielle Antaki at 713.667.4493, Ext. 10 or Dantaki@thewomensresource.org.

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