Racing Humans Mud Run — Benefiting The Fallen Patriot Fund

June 29, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

The “Racing Humans” 5K run has announced that it will donate 10% of all regular registration fees to The Fallen Patriot Fund of The Mark Cuban Foundation. The Racing Humans event is a 5K “mud run” on July 2, 2011 at the nationally ranked Three Palms Extreme Sports Park in Conroe, Texas.

The Fallen Patriot Fund was established to help families of U.S. military personnel who were killed or seriously injured during military operations in Iraq. Financial resources are vital to help the families of those armed forces members who have made an extreme or the ultimate sacrifice.

According to Racing Humans promoter Emil Schebelbon, “the reason we picked The Fallen Patriot Fund is because it honors the sacrifice of our military and 100% of the funds go directly to the benefiting military families. Running our 5K Racing Humans mud run during the Fourth of July holiday in Texas will be no easy challenge, but it hardly compares to the sacrifice made by our military.”

Brian Cuban agrees that the Racing Humans event is a good fit for The Fallen Patriot Fund. “The Racing Humans mud run seems like 5K of pure insanity and extreme exercise, but donating 10% of each regular registrant’s $50 entrance fee is a great way to celebrate July Fourth and the military which have made incredible sacrifices.”

The Racing Humans event is a thrill seeker’s dream adventure run! It is an extreme sport mud run that is 5K in length with 10 different obstacles: Mud Mountain, Dumpster Dune, Tire Torture, the Pit of Despair, Hell Hills, Water Boarding, the Belly Crawl, High Step Over, Tarzan and the Alligator Alley pond swim.

Runners will be grouped and released in waves every half hour from 8 am to 10 pm. All Saturday there will be plenty of family friendly entertainment including food, live music and fireworks afterwards. Registration is $50.

For more information, visit either the RacingHumans.com or FallenPatriotFund.org website, or email info@racinghumans.com. To make a donation to the Fallen Patriot Fund, visit FallenPatriotFund.org.

NOVEMBER “CELEBRITY” FASHION SHOW BENEFITS FAMILY SERVICES OF GREATER HOUSTON

June 29, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

The annual ‘UNA NOTTE IN ITALIA” (A Night in Italy) “celebrity” Fashion Show presented by Festari for Men promises to be a fun-filled evening that includes cocktails, dinner and dancing as well as a silent and live auction.

The highlight of the night is the “celebrity” men’s Fashion Show featuring local businessmen and athletes who take to the runway for this worthy cause.

DAY, DATE, TIME: Friday, November 4, 2011, 7:30pm

NEW LOCATION: Omni Houston Hotel

FEATURING: Festari for Men Fashion Show with “celebrity” male models

PARTY NOTES: Dinner, Fashion Show, Live auction, Dancing

ATTIRE: Cocktail “Elegante”

CO-CHAIRMEN: Elizabeth Petersen and Melissa Mithoff

HONORARY CHAIRMEN: Rudy and Debbie Festari

BENEFICIARY: Family Services of Greater Houston

Ticket and table starting prices: Tickets from $200, Tables of ten (10) from $2,000

Contact: Alice McCalla at 713-802-7857 or amccalla@familyservices.org

Website: www.familyservices.org

Family Services of Greater Houston is one of Houston’s oldest nonprofit social organizations. Since 1904, Family Services has been providing families with the counseling and guidance they need to strengthen themselves and their relationships.

Missing Mexico

June 27, 2011 by  
Filed under Blogs, Hot Button / Lynn Ashby

By Lynn Ashby                                    27 June 2011

MISSING MEXICO

THE TEX-MEX CAFÉ – Enchiladas, tamales, tequila, mariachi music and some Alivia bottled water. This restaurant is about as close as Texans can get to Mexico these days. It’s a shame because, when it comes to trips south of the border, every Texan has memories, some fond, some not so fond (hence my bottled water). Shopping along border towns for hats, pots, Elvis on velvet. Farther inland, including Mexico City, there was more shopping. I suspect most houses in Texas have something hecho en Mexico.

Ah, the food. It was hard to beat a star-lit evening at a café patio (circa 1510) sipping a margarita, woofing down a platter of tacos al carbon and listening to the music. The history, too. Texas and Mexico share so much history, much of it bloody. The first column I ever wrote was from Chapultepec Castle in Mexico City looking for the Alamo flag. Then it disappeared “for reconditioning,” never to reappear. And for many a young macho Texan, it was a rite of passage to visit Boys Town in Nuevo Laredo. From the halls of Montezuma to the shores of Cancun, Mexico was a delight.

But to paraphrase Yogi Berra, no one goes there anymore — it’s too empty. Juarez, with 3,100 murders last year, is considered the deadliest city in the world.  Remember that at one time there was a streetcar line that ran between El Paso and Juarez, the only such international link in the world. Last time I looked, the tracks were still there, but no street cars, and the border looked like Checkpoint Charlie.

According to the Government of Mexico, 34,612 people have been killed in narcotics-related violence in that country since December of 2006, when President Felipe Calderon declared war against the drug king pins and deployed Mexican troops to the fight them. More than 15,000 narcotics-related homicides occurred just last year, an increase of almost two-thirds compared to 2009. A steep increase. In April, the U.S. State Department broadened its travel warning for Mexico, advising citizens to avoid certain areas and don’t drive at night. The State Department reported 111Americans were murdered in Mexico last year. (The Texas DPS puts it at 65. That’s quite a difference.)

Most of those killed in narcotics-related violence have been drug gang members, but bystanders have also been murdered, as have Mexican cops and soldiers. Acapulco, once the getaway for Frank Sinatra and Hollywood elite, was already turning a bit seedy, surpassed by Cancun, Cozumel and Puerto Vallarta. Now gun battles between competing drug cartels rage up and down Acapulco’s streets.

This violence is, well, killing tourism. Nearly half of all available rooms in 70 major resort centers have been vacant this year, except for Easter that nearly filled the hotels for a few days. In Acapulco, last year the resort occupancy rate slid 7 percentage points to 38.4 percent from 2008. In that same period, Cancun’s rate tumbled from 72.1 percent to 57.4 percent, according to the Mexico Tourism Board. Los Cabos, Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Maya have seen similar declines.

Overall, the number of international visitors fell 13 percent to 79.8 million in 2010 from 91.5 million in 2008, according to Banco de Mexico. Travel to Mexico from the U.S. dropped by 4 percent in 2009, according to the U.S. Commerce Department.  And the downward trend continues: In January, 3.8 million day-trippers crossed the U.S. border into Mexico, down 16 percent from the same month last year. Even so, tourism provides Mexico its third largest source of revenue. This year the industry still is expected to account for 13 percent of Mexico’s gross domestic product and nearly 15 percent of domestic jobs. But that’s also down from earlier years.

The violence is particularly a worry during the American colleges’ annual spring break, when thousands, if not tens of thousands, of bikini-clad co-eds were pursued by drunken frat rats across the sand dunes. The most recent Texas DPS travel warning, issued in time for spring break this year, wanders around a bit warning of drug violence, then ends with a very unbureaucratic: “Our safety message is simple: avoid traveling to Mexico during Spring Break and stay alive.”

The tourist industries in both countries are fighting back. Recently a traveling circus of Mexican government officials and Texas tourist agents visited Texas officials and newspapers, saying that Texas’ current warning is too broad and is hurting business. They claimed less than 5 percent of Mexico is affected by cartel and drug violence, and wanted future DPS travel warnings to point out which areas of Mexico pose the most threat to tourists. “Out of roughly 2,500 municipalities, only 80 are currently recording problems with drug violence,” a trade association official said. Specifically, the organizations claimed popular resort cities such as Cancun, Los Cabos and Cozumel are not dangerous for Americans. The DPS stood its ground, noting that even popular resort areas are drug battlegrounds.

Before we get too condescending about our neighbors’ drug wars, we must remember that if there was no market among us gringos for Mexican drugs, or drugs passing to us through Mexico from Colombia, etc., there wouldn’t be any Mexican drug trade, no turf wars, decapitated bodies or rampant terror. (I was about to add “no corruption,” but why bother?) Also, Texans are turning a buck on the chaos. ATF figures 70 percent of all guns seized in Mexico in 2009 and 2010 came from the U.S., with Houston, San Antonio and Dallas figuring prominently in the gun smuggling. Then there is the cash going south. Drug lords don’t take MasterCard.

So I sit here in this Tex-Mex café, dipping my chips in salsa while remembering the old days when all we had to worry about south of the border was Montezuma’s revenge. I take a sip of my prized Alivia water and casually read the label. “Product of Mexico. Water source: municipal supply.” All of a sudden I don’t feel so good.

 

Ashby stays put at ashby2@comcast.net

 

 

 

Red Hot Block Parties Bring Neighbors Together for Sizzling Summer Fun

June 27, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

Whether it is a part of your staycation summer plans or just a great excuse to enjoy Houston’s diverse community, grab your neighbor and head out to a Red Hot Block Party coming your way July 23 in Sugar Land, August 6 in Conroe, and August 13 in League City.

Red Hot Block Parties will take place in and around Houston for some sizzling summer fun connecting neighbors with neighbors and featuring great music, craft beers, wine tastings, concessions, interactive activities, and more. Find unique items in the vendor village and meet your area neighbors and businesses. Plus, bring the kids for a family experience. Interactive children’s activities will be available to keep the whole family entertained.

The red hot events kick off at Sugar Land Town Square, 15958 City Walk in Sugar Land on Saturday,
July 23,
5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Spend the evening sampling from 100 craft beer and wines, sway to the beat of the Robert Hartye band and enjoy samples of the slider chefs serving up their best for your vote. Sliders will be served from participating restaurants from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cast your vote for your favorite slider and help crown the night’s Slider Chef Extraordinaire.
On Saturday, August 6, La Torretta Lake Resort & Spa is the hot spot from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.  Located at 600 La Torretta Boulevard in Montgomery, cool off by the water on Lake Conroe with the infinity pool, lazy river, boats, bikinis, grilling stations, live music and more! Special hotel packages are available at www.latorrettalakeresort.com <http://www.latorrettalakeresort.com> .
The Red Hot Block Party series grand finale is Saturday, August 13 at Big League Dreams Sports Park, 2802 1/2 Calder Drive in League City from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Featuring fun food selections provided by Big League Dreams’ own Stadium Club, a Red Hot festival on the fields, live music, craft beers, vendor village and a non-stop party until the sun goes down.
Prices for Red Hot Block Parties range from $15 general admission to a $40 VIP ticket and include tickets for samples of beer.  Parking is free at each location.
Sponsors for the Red Hot Block Party Series include the Brewmasters International Beer Festival,  presented by Spec’s Wine, Spirits and Finer Foods, Moody Gardens Hotel, Spa and Convention Center,
Sugar Land Town Square, La Torretta Lake Resort and Spa and Big League Dreams.

For more information about Red Hot Block Parties, visitwww.redhotblockparty.com <http://www.redhotblockparty.com>   or
call 713-557-5732. Become a fan on Facebook to receive important updates on Red Hot Block Parties and BrewMasters International Beer Festival events and details.

Texas Children’s Cancer Center’s Celebration of Champions

June 27, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

The Texas Children’s Cancer Center’s Celebration of Champions will be held on Wednesday, September 28,  from 11:15 am – 2 pm, at the Hilton Americas-Houston.

The Celebration benefits Texas Children’s Cancer Center’s Long-Term Survivor’s Program, and will be chaired by Sidney Faust, Judy McGee, and Scott Basinger.

The honorees of the program are Bob and Janice McNair, Rudy Avelar, Yvonne C. Cormier, Claire Cormier Thielke, Rose Cullen, Kathy Cullen McCord, Jennifer McCord, Dr. ZoAnn Dreyer, Jan Duncan, Nidhika Mehta, Melissa and Michael Mithoff, Alice Mosing, and Judy and Glenn Smith.

The dress code is business attire. Individual tickets are $150-300, while tables start from $3,000. Complimentary valet and self parking. For more information, contact Eileen Condit ( emcondit@texaschildrens.org ).

Citizens for Animal Protection

June 26, 2011 by  
Filed under Blogs

“Mr. Magoo and his Canine Cops” event was a rip roaring success June 4th at the Hilton of the Americas.
This is the fundraiser that bids farewell to society’s regulars as they hop flights to Aspen, Vail and France. Before they go, they strike a pose on the runway with their furry friends. Some noteworthy models: Carolyn St. Clair with Spencer & Tallulah, Natalie Wall with Boo Radley, Angelica Chapman with Stormy and Bruce Padilla and Shelby Kibodeaux with Toby.

The event honored ALPOS – retired Houston K-9 Officer and officer Greg Smith. The evening was dedicated in loving memory of Ellen Kogen a cherished CAP supporter and friend.

Edible Texas Wine & Food Match

June 26, 2011 by  
Filed under Blogs

Perfect Pairings
Austin Chef David Garrido Offers Pairing Perfection and Wins Regional Wine and Food Competition

What a perfect pairing: regional cuisine and regional wine! Five Central Texas restaurants teamed with Texas wineries and created a 15-course extravaganza of taste. At the Edible Texas Wine and Food Match, owner and executive chef David Garrido of Garrido’s Restaurant won both the judges’ and peoples’ choice awards for his three-course menu paired with Fall Creek Vineyards and Sister Creek Vineyards wines.

One of the most creative food preparations of the evening was the appetizer from the winning chef, a crispy oyster with Habanero Honey Aioli and Pico de Gallo paired with Fall Creek Chenin Blanc 2010.

The second course sealed the deal for the group of hungry diners at my table. Coffee Chipotle Marinated Beef Tenderloin with Red Beet and Black Truffle Sauce paired with Fall Creek Meritus 2006.

It was hard to save room for dessert, but we did it. Pastel de Calabaza with Lemon Crema and Caramelized Pecans paired with Sister Creek Muscat Canelli 2010.

The organizers of this event believe
“what grows together, goes together.”
For more information:
www.edibleaustin.com

Spray Suncreen

June 25, 2011 by  
Filed under Edit

EarthTalk®
E – The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Isn’t spray sunscreen a health and environmental nightmare when it seems that more of the sunscreen ends up going up my nose than on the kid at the beach next to me?
— Lillian Robertson, Methuen, MA

Spray cans of sunscreen may no longer contain chlorofluorocarbons (also known as CFCs, which were phased out in the 1990s for causing holes in the stratospheric ozone layer), but many contain other chemicals that are no good for our health or the environment. Researchers have found that the chemicals and/or minerals in the vast majority of commercially available sunscreens—even the rub-in creamy or oily varieties—can cause health problems just from ordinary use; inhaling them only magnifies the risks.

And just what are the risks? According to the non-profit Environmental Working Group (EWG), there are two major types of sunscreens available in the U.S. “Chemical” sunscreens, the more common kind, penetrate the skin and may disrupt the body’s endocrine system, as their active ingredients (e.g., octylmethylcinnamate, oxybenzone, avobenzone, benzophone, mexoryl, PABA or PARSOL 1789) mimic the body’s natural hormones and as such can essentially confuse the body’s systems. Quite a risk to take, considering that the chemical varieties don’t even work for very long once applied.

Meanwhile, “mineral” sunscreens are considered somewhat safer, as their active ingredients are natural elements such as zinc or titanium. But “micronized” or “nano-scale” particles of these minerals can get below the skin surface and cause allergic reactions and other problems for some people. EWG recommends sticking with “mineral” sunscreens whenever possible but, more important, taking other precautions to avoid prolonged sun exposure altogether. “At EWG we use sunscreens, but we look for shade, wear protective clothing, and avoid the noontime sun before we smear on the cream,” the group reports.

As for spray varieties, EWG recommends avoiding them entirely: “These ingredients are not meant to be inhaled into the lungs.” With so little known about the effects of sunscreen chemicals on the body when rubbed into the skin, we may never know how much worse the effects may be when they are inhaled. But suffice it to say: When your neighbor at the beach is spraying down Junior, it’s in your best interest to turn away and cover your nose and mouth.

The root of the problem, according to EWG, is failure on the part of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), despite repeated requests from public health and consumer advocates, to implement sunscreen safety standards, some of which were proposed by government scientists more than three decades ago.

EWG only considers a small percentage of the sunscreens on the market—none of which come packaged in spray cans—safe for human use. Some of the top rated varieties come from manufacturers including All Terrain, Aubrey Organics, Badger, Blue Lizard, California Baby, La Roche-Posay, Purple Prairie Botanicals, thinksport, and UV Natural. None of the mainstream drug store variety brands appear on EWG’s recommended list. The full list is available on the sunscreens section of EWG’s Skin Deep website. With summer now upon us, stock up on good sunscreen before it’s too late.

CONTACT: Skin Deep, www.ewg.org/skindeep.

EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.

Washington County Video

June 25, 2011 by  
Filed under TV

Preview of Alana Stewart Interview

June 25, 2011 by  
Filed under Blogs, TV

I met up with the beautiful Alana Stewart. She was in town to launch her new movie. As Farrah’s best friend, she’s got some great stories to tell. Here is a little sneak preview of our interview.

Backyard BBQ

June 25, 2011 by  
Filed under Blogs, TV

Fire up a steak and invite your friends over.

Dynamo Girls Calendar

June 25, 2011 by  
Filed under Blogs, Travel Blog, TV

H Texas caught up with the Dynamo Girls at the Hotel Galvez as they were shooting their calendar. Ladies, you are beautiful!

The Center Foundation 22nd Annual Novemberfest

June 24, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

The Center Foundation announces its 22nd annual Novemberfest, with the Metric Century MS 150 Recommended Ride and Family Fun Festival, on Saturday, November 5, 2011, at Willow River’s Farm in San Felipe, Texas, and chaired by Tom Wurth and Judy Tuttle-Wurth.

Discounts on early registration start July 2011. For more information, contact The Center Foundation at 713.525.8484 or www.novemberfestmetriccentury.org. To register for the ride, go to www.active.com

The Children’s Music Foundation performs National Anthem for Houston Astros

June 24, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

The Children’s Music Foundation performs the National Anthem for the Houston Astros, Sunday, June 26, 2011, before the 1:05 p.m. game.

Come out to Minute Maid Ballpark and watch Houston based non-profit, The Children’s Music Foundation, perform the National Anthem for the Houston Astros.

Musical Performers: TCMF founder, Daren Hightower, will sing the National Anthem with 15-year old Houston high school student, Robin Elyse Harwell.  Accompanying the singers on guitar; William Koen (14), Christian Hightower (14), Ethan Price (12) and Tina Doan (13).

To support The Children’s Music Foundation and sit with board members, volunteers and other supporters; you may buy tickets here:

https://oss.ticketmaster.com/html/group_corp_start.htmI?l=EN&team=astros&owner=7257196&group=214&err=&event=&customerID=

To buy a $10 event t-shirt: http://thechildrensmusicfoundation.org/?page=calendar&display=116

Legacy Community Health Services 9th Annual Luncheon

June 24, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

Legacy Community Health Services presents its 9th Annual Luncheon on Tuesday, September 20, 2011. The luncheon will take place in Wortham Theatre’s Grand Foyer at 11:30 AM. It will be chaired by Phoebe Tudor and Ceron, and will honor Jackson Hicks.

Individual tickets start at $250, while tables of ten go from $2,500 – $30,000.

For more information, contact Zulema Franco at zfranco@legacycommunityhealth.com or 713.830.3083.

March of Dimes Signature Chefs’ Gala

June 24, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

Who: March of Dimes

What: Signature Chefs’ Gala

When: Thursday, October 13, 2011

Where: Hilton Americas

Honorary Chairs: Sheridan and John Eddie Williams

Chairs: Rosemary Schatzman and Vanessa Sendukas

2011 Culinary Honorees: Donna and Tony Vallone

Medical Honoree: Linda Russell, CEO of The Woman’s Hospital of Texas

Community Honorees: Elizabeth and Gary Petersen

Fund the Mission Honorees: Elizabeth and Anthony DeLuca and Family

Tariff: Tickets from $500, Tables from $5,000

Party Notes: Presented by Wells Fargo; Cocktail Attires;  Signature Chefs’ Culinary Delights; Select and Unique Wine; Live & Big Board Auctions; Fund the Mission; After Party

SOCIETY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 15th Annual Luncheon Wednesday, October 26, 2011

June 22, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

Society for the Performing Arts, bringing the World’s best to Houston, just announced that this year’s annual luncheon will feature guest speaker Amy Chua.  This year’s luncheon is being chaired by Karen Pulaski Tyrell and will take place on Wednesday, October 26, 2011 on the Jones Hall Stage, beginning at 11:00 am.  Another highlight of the luncheon will be the presentation of the 2011 Ann Sakowitz Performing Arts Advocate Award to Patsy Fourticq.

Guest Speaker Amy Chua’s current book, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, is an awe-inspiring, often hilarious, and unerringly honest story of one mother’s exercise in extreme parenting.  Her personal account reveals the rewards, and the costs of raising her children as her parents raised her, the Chinese way.   Dr. Chua is a dynamic and respected author with global insights into parenting, world powers, and economics. A departure from her usual writing, Yale Law Professor Amy Chua’s third book is a parenting memoir that espouses Chinese traditions of child rearing and raising her children for success.

The proceeds from the luncheon provide the necessary funds needed for SPA’s Education and Outreach Program, Beyond the Stage that takes the performing arts into the community to present unique learning experiences enriching the lives of more than 120,000 underserved

children and adolescents in the greater Houston area annually. SPA’s educational programming includesMaster Classes, ResidenciesTeacher WorkshopsLecture/DemonstrationsCreative Writing/Choreography Programs, Student Matinees and Transportation Funding, plus performance tickets free of charge to Houston’s most underserved students. Research shows that academic performance improves and dropout rates go down when students are involved in the arts.

Since 1966, Society for the Performing Arts has built a reputation as the most innovative community-oriented nonprofit presenting organization in Houston.  Last season, more than 100,000 Houstonians enjoyed SPA.’s performances.  All funds raised at this event will benefit the education and outreach programs of Society for the Performing Arts.

WHO: Society for the Performing Arts

WHAT: 15th Annual Luncheon: Benefiting Society for the Performing Arts’ Education and Outreach Programming – Beyond the Stage

WHEN: Wednesday, October 26, 2011, 11:00 AM

WHERE:  Jones Hall Stage

CHAIRS: Karen Pulaski Tyrell

Honoring: Patsy Fourticq, Recipient of the Ann Sakowitz Performing Arts Advocate Award

SPEAKER: Amy Chua, Author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

TARIF: Tables Begin at: $5,000, Individual Tickets Begin at: $500

Contact: William Tayar (William@spahouston.org, 713-632-8103)

 

Girls Night Out: Houston Fall 2011

June 22, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

Girls Night Out is coming to Houston and you’re invited! Discover unique designers, sip our delectable drinks, and cap your night with some pretty pampering and glorious Goodie Bags (trust us, you don’t want to miss the goodies).

(Must be 21+ to attend the event.)

WHERE: The Crystal Ballroom at the Rice Hotel
909 Texas Ave.

WHEN: September 14 – 15

TIME: 5 pm -10 pm

To learn more about Girls Night Out, visit http://bit.ly/frTVME.

Houston Arboretum & Nature Center Calendar of Events July 2011

June 22, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

HOUSTON—The Houston Arboretum & Nature Center, a lush 155-acre nature preserve, is one of the city’s greatest natural treasures.  Located in Memorial Park, at 4501 Woodway Drive, the Arboretum is home to more than 75 varieties of native trees, 160 species of birds, 16 species of turtles, 10 species of frogs and 33 kinds of butterflies.  Visitors can explore and enjoy five miles of walking trails to experience nature at its most dramatic and in exquisite detail. The Arboretum grounds are open to the public daily, except major holidays, from dawn to dusk.

The Nature Center building is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Discovery Room is open every day except Mondays, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and provides fun, hands-on activities and exhibits to explore nature up close.  Admission is free, but donations to support this nonprofit organization are appreciated.

A bustling schedule of year round activities and courses are available for adults, children and families to create a sense of wonder and appreciation for nature. For more information, call 713-681-8433 or visitwww.houstonarboretum.org <http://www.HoustonArboretum.org>

Pre-registration is required for the following activities/events.
Call 713-681-8433 or visit www.houstonarboretum.org
<http://www.houstonarboretum.orgfor more information

Summer Nature Trekkers Camp for kids
June 6 – August 12
9 a.m. – 3 p.m. (limited half day options are available)
Kids can explore everything from hawks and other birds that soar in our skies to the microscopic creatures that live in ponds in the Houston Arboretum & Nature Center’s Nature Trekkers Camps this summer. The week-long classes offer hands-on learning experiences for children ages 5 to 12 under the guidance of staff naturalists, and include both indoor and outdoor activities at the 155-acre nature sanctuary. Camp topics include: “Bird Life,” July 11-15; “MicroWorld Explorer,” July 18-22; “Reptiles & Amphibians,” July 25-29; “Angry Earth,” June 27-July 1 or August 1-5; and “Spiders,” July 5-8 or August 8-12.   Children are taught by qualified staff naturalists in classes by age (5 & 6, 7 & 8, 9-12). Full day camp (9 a.m. – 3 p.m.): $250 members; $300 non-members. Morning only camp (9 a.m. – noon): $130 members; $165 non-members. For more information, call 713-681-8433 or visit www.houstonarboretum.org/summercamp.asp <http://www.houstonarboretum.org/summercamp.asp>

Now available! After camp classes provide enriching activities for children from 3 to 5 p.m. Classes include Yoga for Kids, offered weeks starting: July 5, July 18 and August 1 and Art Camp classes taught by City ArtWorks the weeks of July 11, July 25 and August 8.  Cost per week is $100 for members; $125 for non-members.  For more information visit www.houstonarboretum.org.

Monday, July 4 – Building will be closed; trails and grounds open regular hours.

Saturdays, July 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30
9 – 10 a.m.
Wednesdays, July 6, 13, 20 & 27
5:456:45 p.m.
Introductory Tai Chi
The Arboretum provides a serene, natural backdrop for this graceful and meditative form of exercise. Class will be held outside in the nature sanctuary except when weather conditions are prohibitive. Cost is $15 per session or $45 per month for 1 class per week; $70 per month for 2 classes per week.

Thursdays, July 7, 14, 21 & 28
5:456:45 p.m.
Yoga on the way Home
Why fight the traffic? Slow down and relax in the peaceful beauty of the Arboretum during a one-hour yoga session in the Arboretum’s classroom overlooking the forest. Cost is $15 per session or $12 per session when registering for a month.

Tuesday, July 5 – Friday, July 8
9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Ages 5-12
Nature Trekkers Summer Camp: Spiders!
Spiders can climb the tallest buildings and creep through the tiniest of cracks. Their silk is stronger than any man-made fiber. Kids will get to see tarantulas, black widow spiders and learn all the interesting facts about these arachnids. Cost is $200 for members, $240 for non-members.  Cost for Morning only (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.) camp option is $104 for members, $132 for non-members. Pre-registration required.

Tuesday, July 5 – Friday, July 8
3 – 5 p.m.
Yoga for Kids
Ages 5 – 12
Children enjoy some of the same benefits of yoga that adults do, such as improved body awareness, coordination, and even stress relief. Yoga instructor Nancy Sorenson has been teaching adults and children for 15 years.  She will introduce simple yoga poses that relate to the natural world and incorporate stories, books and play to make this late afternoon class a welcome energy release for kids. Cost is $80 for members; $100 for non-members. Pre-registration required.

Sunday, July 10
2 – 4 p.m.
Eat It Raw: Preparing Raw, Organic, and Seasonal Meals
Join Kristina Carrillo-Bucaram of Rawfully Organic Co-Op and learn how to make delicious meals for the entire family from raw and organic foods. Kristina will share her passion for this healthy lifestyle by teaching and demonstrating how to prepare seasonal dishes from a variety of raw and locally-grown produce. As a fun exercise, students will choose ingredients from a box of organic vegetables and Kristina will craft a dish on the spot. Sampling and an informative question and answer period will finish the class. Cost is $20 for members; $30 for non-members.  Proceeds benefit the Arboretum.

Monday, July 11 – Friday, July 15
9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Ages 5-12
Nature Trekkers Summer Camp: Bird Life
Kids will become amateur ornithologists as they learn the calls and colors of some Texas birds and study eggs, nests, and lifestyles of these feathered friends.  Cost is $250 for members, $300 for non-members.  Cost for Morning only (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.) camp option is $130 for members, $165 for non-members. Pre-registration required.



Monday, July 11 – Friday, July 15
3 – 5 p.m.
Ages 5 – 12
Summer Art Camp: Reptile-O-Rama
Children will explore the world of reptiles while making two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of art from a variety of art materials.  The Houston Arboretum & Nature Center in partnership with City ArtWorks is offering Summer Art Camp classes for ages 5 to 12.  Cost is $100 for members; $125 for non-members. Pre-registration required.

Monday, July 18 – Friday, July 22
9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Ages 5-12
Nature Trekkers Summer Camp: MicroWorld Explorer
Campers will roll over logs and dip nets into ponds as they study the micro-organisms found in soil, water, and even the air.  Activities will include making worm compost bottles to take home and an interactive session with scientists in Illinois for the unique opportunity to view insects with a scanning electron microscope.  Cost is $250 for members, $300 for non-members.  Cost for Morning only (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.) camp option is $130 for members, $165 for non-members. Pre-registration required.

Monday, July 18 – Friday, July 22
3 – 5 p.m.
Ages 5-12
Yoga for Kids
Children enjoy some of the same benefits of yoga that adults do, such as improved body awareness, coordination, and even stress relief. Yoga instructor Nancy Sorenson has been teaching adults and children for 15 years.  She will introduce simple yoga poses that relate to the natural world and incorporate stories, books and play to make this late afternoon class a welcome energy release for kids. Cost is $100 for members; $125 for non-members. Pre-registration required.

Monday, July 25 – Friday, July 29
9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Ages 5-12
Nature Trekkers Summer Camp: Reptiles & Amphibians
Kids will learn all about snakes, turtles, frogs, and lizards – from what they eat and where they live to how to safely observe reptiles and amphibians in the environment. Cost is $250 for members, $300 for non-members.  Cost for Morning only (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.) camp option is $130 for members, $165 for non-members. Pre-registration required.

Monday, July 25 – Friday, July 29
3 – 5 p.m.
Ages 5 to 12
Summer Art Camp: Nature’s Architecture
Children will look at everything from bird’s nests to spider webs and flowers to study radial balance, symmetry and other designs in nature.  The Houston Arboretum & Nature Center in partnership with City ArtWorks is offering Summer Art Camp classes for ages 5 to 12. Cost is $100 for members; $125 for non-members.  Pre-registration required.

Coming in August …

Monday, August 1 – Friday, August 5
9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Ages 5-12
Nature Trekkers Summer Camp: Angry Earth
Hurricanes, volcanoes, tsunamis, and tornadoes and other forces of nature will be highlighted in this week of camp.  Kids will make models of the Earth’s layers, learn about weather and make volcanoes.
Cost is $250 for members, $300 for non-members.  Cost for Morning only (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.) camp option is $130 for members, $165 for non-members. Pre-registration required.

Monday, August 1 – Friday, August 5
3 – 5 p.m.
Ages 5 – 12
Yoga for Kids
Children enjoy some of the same benefits of yoga that adults do, such as improved body awareness, coordination, and even stress relief. Yoga instructor Nancy Sorenson has been teaching adults and children for 15 years.  She will introduce simple yoga poses that relate to the natural world. Nancy will incorporate stories, books and play to make this late afternoon class a welcome energy release for kids. Cost is $100 for members; $125 for non-members. Pre-registration required.

Monday, August 8 – Friday, August 12
9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Ages 5-12
Nature Trekkers Summer Camp: Spiders!
Spiders can climb the tallest buildings and creep through the tiniest of cracks. Their silk is stronger than any man-made fiber. Kids will get to see tarantulas, black widow spiders and learn all the interesting facts about these arachnids. Cost is $250 for members, $300 for non-members.  Cost for Morning only (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.) camp option is $130 for members, $165 for non-members. Pre-registration required.

Monday, August 8 – Friday, August 12
3 – 5 p.m.
Ages 5 to 12
Summer Art Camp: Animalia
The Houston Arboretum & Nature Center in partnership with City ArtWorks is offering Summer Art Camp classes for ages 5 to 12.  All types of animals, large and small, will be the inspiration for a week of crazy creations!  Cost is $100 for members; $125 for non-members.  Pre-registration required.

 

 

Miller Outdoor Theatre July 2011 Calendar

June 22, 2011 by  
Filed under Events

There’s something for everyone on stage at Miller Outdoor Theatre in Hermann Park.  From daytime programs especially for young children to family friendly evening performances of music, dance, theatre and more, this is Houston’s best entertainment value.  Admission is FREE!
For a complete schedule, visit www.milleroutdoortheatre.com.

Please note important change in Tickets and Seating policy and procedure this 2011:
***ALL performances except for movies and the daytime children’s performances require tickets for assigned seating under the canopy.
Free tickets are available on a first-come first-serve basis (4 per person over age 16 while they last) at the Miller Outdoor Theatre box office the day of the performance between the hours of 10:30 a.m.—1 p.m. for assigned seating under the canopy. If tickets remain at 1 p.m., the box office will re-open one hour before show time to distribute the remaining tickets. As always, open seating on the hill.
Under normal circumstances, all unoccupied/unclaimed seats are released 5 minutes before the show is scheduled to begin. We encourage all patrons to be in their assigned seats at least 10 minutes before showtime to insure that their seat is not released. Again, there is NO charge for tickets. Tickets may not be reserved by phone. Only four (4) tickets per person. At managements’ discretion, all unoccupied seats may be released at any time for any reason.
Denotes free assigned seats available for covered seating area.
Denotes captioned performance.
Denotes audio descriptio

 

Journey through China

July 1, 11 a.m.
Learn about China’s culture, traditions and history during this interactive performance featuring authentic Chinese dance.
Produced by Dance of Asian America

Movies at Miller – 2001: A Space Odyssey

July 1, 8:30 p.m.
Stanley Kubrick’s landmark film about the ascent of mankind into the space age.
Presented by Miller Outdoor Theatre


Step Afrika!

July 2, 8 p.m.
Intricate kicks, stomps, and rhythms pound the floor and spoken word fills the air in an exhilarating performance from this internationally-acclaimed company.
Presented by Miller Outdoor Theatre

 

ExxonMobil Summer Symphony Nights Independence Day

July 4, 8:30 p.m.
Principal Pops Conductor Michael Krajewski presents a rousing musical salute to Independence Day.  Tchaikovsky’s stirring 1812 Overture!  All-American favorites!  Fantastic fireworks!

Produced by Houston Symphony
Fireworks courtesy of Miller Theatre Advisory Board

 

Urban Cowboy: The Musical

(Captioned performance July 15; Audio described performance July 17)

July 14 – 19, 8:15 pm
The tale of a cowboy living in the big city and his Texas-sized romance with a local gal, all set to country’s greatest music.


Produced by Theatre Under The Stars

Children’s Hilltop Festival
Produced by Express Children’s Theatre

Little Red Riding Hood
July 18, 11 a.m.
The enduring children’s classic.  The wolf gets a whiff of the goodies Little Red is carrying to Grandmother’s house and will do anything to get them from her.

The Tortoise and the Hare
July 19, 11 a.m.
A fresh take on an old favorite.  Will slow and steady win the race?

The Princess and the Pea
July 21, 11 a.m.
A bilingual (English/Spanish) adaptation of the Hans Christian Andersen classic.  Will the Princess pass the test and marry her Prince?

Adventures of Tom and Huck
July 22, 11 a.m.
A rollicking musical adaptation of Mark Twain’s novels about the wild adventures of boyhood friends.


The Gourds and Doyle Bramhall

July 22, 8 p.m.
Austin’s The Gourds bring their kaleidoscopic-country sound to Hermann Park. Texas music legend Doyle Bramhall kicks off the musical evening.

Presented by Miller Outdoor Theatre

 

Houston Shakespeare Festival

Produced by Houston Shakespeare Festival


Othello

July 29, 31, August 2, 4 and 6, 8:30 pm
(Captioned performance July 29; Audio description August 4)

Iago, one of the theatre’s greatest villains, draws the outsider General Othello, his beautiful wife Desdemona, the young lieutenant Cassio, into a whirlpool of jealousy.

Taming of the Shrew

July 30, August 3, 5 and 7, 8:30 pm
(Captioned performance August 4; Audio description August 3)

Shakespeare’s rollicking comedy of two headstrong people crashing together returns to the Miller Stage.

Next Page »